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barque

Line breaks: barque
Pronunciation: /bɑːk
 
/

Definition of barque in English:

noun

1A sailing ship, typically with three masts, in which the foremast and mainmast are square-rigged and the mizzenmast is rigged fore and aft.
Example sentences
  • The latest vessel to confirm its involvement is the 295-feet long Eagle, a three-masted sailing barque with 21,350 square feet of sail and five miles of rigging.
  • The difference between a barque and a ship is the way the aftmost mast is rigged.
  • The sea reflected our good fortune in hues of glassy green, turquoise and cobalt blue and into this unearthly vision we quietly launched our sailing barque.
1.1 literary A boat.
Example sentences
  • The lesser barques and rowboats that move about in the background are those of Religion.
  • The barked torrent of words flowed over me: a cataract of verbiage with unknown phrases sticking up like sharp rocks to confound the frail barque of my self-confidence and perhaps overwhelm it.
  • Bishop Peter J. Lee had for many years been viewed as a moderate, tilting to this side or that in order to keep his little barque afloat.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, probably from Provençal barca, from late Latin barca 'ship's boat'.

More
  • bark from (Old English):

    Dogs have always barked, so it is not surprising that bark is a prehistoric word. If someone's bark is worse than their bite they are not as ferocious as they appear. To bark at the moon meaning ‘to make a fuss with no effect’, is first recorded in the 17th century. To bark up the wrong tree is from 19th-century America. People have been barking or barking mad since the 1930s. The bark of a tree is possibly related to the name of the birch tree (Old English). Bark or barque (Middle English) is also an old-fashioned word for a boat from Latin barca ‘ship's boat’, from which we get embark (mid 16th century).

Definition of barque in:

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