There are 2 main definitions of billet in English:

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billet1

Line breaks: bil¦let
Pronunciation: /ˈbɪlɪt
 
/

noun

1A place, especially a civilian’s house, where soldiers are lodged temporarily: the sergeant gave them leave to rest while officers went in search of billets
More example sentences
  • The billets for these Russian soldiers were at No.6 the Bund, previously the P&O Banking Corp (now the Yangtze River Navigation Co building).
  • During the Second World War the building became a billet for soldiers.
  • Built to protect the Solent from French invaders as part of a system of forts, it had a billet for 150 soldiers, is built almost entirely of granite blocks and measures 162 ft across.
Synonyms
1.1 informal A place to stop or stay: the young people’s stay at each of their billets was short
More example sentences
  • Moves within the scouting movement mean that future scouts and guides are more likely to stay in hotel style billets than traditional tents.
  • I'd have preferred a cot until they got us semipermanent billets to stay in; at least cots can be sprayed with Lysol.
  • He had meant to stay the night and had been given a billet, but something drew him on - we all have choices.

verb (billets, billeting, billeted)

[with object and adverbial of place] Back to top  
1Lodge (soldiers) in a particular place, especially a civilian’s house: most of the army was billeted within the town
More example sentences
  • For much of European history barracks were the exception rather than the rule, and soldiers were billeted in civilian lodgings or public houses.
  • A brutal military terror in which thousands died was followed up by billeting the soldiers on the better-off citizens of the provincial capitals, while their sovereign courts were exiled to remote small towns.
  • There are sympathetic descriptions of some of the local people - Dutch and German - on whom the soldiers were billeted.
Synonyms
1.1Assign temporary accommodation to: the American team was billeted at Uxbridge
More example sentences
  • And residents have billeted their homes to accommodate the overspill.
  • Made up mostly of U.S. Customs art-theft experts, the American team has been billeted inside the museum complex since late April.
  • One great example is billeting, otherwise known as the act of offering accommodation to visiting sports players and accepting it for your own on long trips away from the Alice.

Origin

late Middle English (originally denoting a short written document): from Anglo-Norman French billette, diminutive of bille (see bill1). The verb is recorded in the late 16th century, and the noun sense, 'a written order requiring a householder to lodge the bearer, usually a soldier', from the mid 17th century; hence the current meaning.

More
  • A billet (from Anglo-Norman French billette, a little bill) was once a short written document. In the mid 17th century, it came to be a ‘written order requiring a householder to lodge the bearer of the billet’; this was usually a soldier, hence the current meaning ‘temporary lodging for a soldier’. The early sense is preserved in the old-fashioned billet-doux, French for ‘sweet letter’. See also billiards

Words that rhyme with billet

filet, fillet, millet, skillet, willet

Definition of billet in:

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There are 2 main definitions of billet in English:

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billet2

Line breaks: bil¦let
Pronunciation: /ˈbɪlɪt
 
/

noun

1A thick piece of wood.
Example sentences
  • Tucker refused the original proposal to buy the European company's bats, instead working out a deal in which Louisville Slugger buys billets of wood and makes its own product.
  • Here is a billet of wood, the circumference of which is about that of the throat.
  • Quickly she picked up all the wood and started to make up some more billets, hoping the the noise would indicate to him that she was busy.
1.1A small bar of metal for further processing.
Example sentences
  • Unique to the U - 2 is that the main wing planks are milled from large single billets of metal, rather than built up of riveted sheet metal, I-beams and U-channels.
  • Extrusion: In this process a cylinder or billet of metal is forced through an orifice by means of a ram to such effect that the elongated and extruded metal has a transverse shape which is that of the die orifice.
  • These advances are due chiefly to the sculpted air entries, the concentric and ridge-free venturi, and the emulsifying process that takes place in the billet metering blocks.
2 Architecture Each of a series of short cylindrical pieces inserted at intervals in Norman decorative mouldings.
Example sentences
  • The nine windows extending out from the roof directly below the ridge recalled the roof billets perched on the roof of the main sanctuary and certain subsidiary buildings at Ise Shrine.
  • Billet moulding, a series of little rolls like a dotted line, and chevron, or zigzag moulding were widely used.
  • A billet-moulding surrounds each arch, which has a plain rib in the soffit.
3 Heraldry A rectangle placed vertically as a charge.
Example sentences
  • Period armory seems to have considered the billet equivalent to the delf and no difference is granted between them in Society heraldry.
  • The billet is a rectangular block, much the shape of a house brick.
  • The billet or rectangle represents the grant of land on which the parish was built in 1845

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French billette and billot, diminutives of bille 'tree trunk', from medieval Latin billa, billus 'branch, trunk', probably of Celtic origin.

More
  • A billet (from Anglo-Norman French billette, a little bill) was once a short written document. In the mid 17th century, it came to be a ‘written order requiring a householder to lodge the bearer of the billet’; this was usually a soldier, hence the current meaning ‘temporary lodging for a soldier’. The early sense is preserved in the old-fashioned billet-doux, French for ‘sweet letter’. See also billiards

Definition of billet in:

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