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binocular

Line breaks: bin|ocu¦lar
Pronunciation: /bɪˈnɒkjʊlə
 
/

Definition of binocular in English:

adjective

Adapted for or using both eyes: a binocular microscope
More example sentences
  • This would be the bird remains, after cleaning the feathers in Xylene and mounting the fragments on a microscope slide, using my Nikon binocular microscope, I could tell what the bird was.
  • When the plants flowered, buds of different developmental stages were removed from the main inflorescence and the petals were dissected from the flower bud under a binocular microscope.
  • He was exempted from military service because of a detached retina, and later in his career, when binocular microscopes became the norm, people puzzled why he was happy to still use a monocular one.

Origin

early 18th century (in the sense 'having two eyes'): from Latin bini 'two together' + oculus 'eye', on the pattern of ocular.

Derivatives

binocularly

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • In the group with 6/12 binocular vision, five had uniocular acuities of 6/9 but managed only 6/12 binocularly and two had uniocular acuities of 6/18 but achieved the higher standard binocularly.
  • Rats were prepared to be binocularly deprived in a fashion similar to the methods mentioned above.
  • The observers viewed the display binocularly under conditions of either clockwise or counterclockwise rotation of the annulus.

Words that rhyme with binocular

jocular, ocular

Definition of binocular in:

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