There are 3 definitions of bound in English:

bound1

Line breaks: bound
Pronunciation: /baʊnd
 
/

verb

[no object, with adverbial of direction]
1Walk or run with leaping strides: Louis came bounding down the stairs figurative shares bounded ahead in early dealing
More example sentences
  • Sally bounded up to him when he walked into the building alone the next morning.
  • We do not know who won the high jump or the triple jump except that a couple of Swedes have gone bounding down the track in delight.
  • Valentine sensed the relaxed atmosphere and bounded up to Aimée, jumping up on her.
Synonyms
1.1(Of an object) rebound from a surface: bullets bounded off the veranda
More example sentences
  • Painter Henri Matisse had rooms overlooking the market, and you could see where he got his inspiration as the sunlight bounded off ochre walls in these tall, narrow streets.
  • The ball bounded off the wall and Jeter went into second standing up.
  • I didn't glance up from my plate until a roll bounded off the side of my head.

noun

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A leaping movement towards or over something: I went up the steps in two effortless bounds
More example sentences
  • Water was run across, buildings were leapt in a single bound, swords made appropriately dramatic sounds as they were sliced through the air.
  • But only recently have videogames started making leaps and bounds towards a unified interactive product.
  • In a single bound, he leaped over a Texas blocker to force a game-sealing interception earlier this year.
Synonyms

Origin

early 16th century (as a noun): from French bond (noun), bondir (verb) 'resound', later 'rebound', from late Latin bombitare, from Latin bombus 'humming'.

Definition of bound in:

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzit
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something

There are 3 definitions of bound in English:

bound2

Line breaks: bound
Pronunciation: /baʊnd
 
/

adjective

1Going or ready to go towards a specified place: an express train bound for Edinburgh [in combination]: the three moon-bound astronauts
More example sentences
  • That where he is bound come April 5, when he will attempt to better his brave fourth place in last year's National.
  • Much to my delight, the traffic was heading in the other direction and I had the northern bound freeway to myself.
  • But how many minutes will the bench - bound Italian with the stylised facial hair play against the Koreans?
1.1Destined or very likely to have a specified experience: they were bound for disaster
More example sentences
  • While these students are likely not bound for careers in music, they are the future core of the volunteer choir, the town band and the community orchestra.
  • Although we can see that it is bound for failure, it is fascinating to follow its journey.
  • Any attempt at explaining higher meanings to be derived from Judo is bound for failure.

Origin

Middle English boun (in the sense 'ready, dressed'), from Old Norse búinn, past participle of búa 'get ready'; the final -d is euphonic, or influenced by bound4.

Definition of bound in:

There are 3 definitions of bound in English:

bound3

Line breaks: bound
Pronunciation: /baʊnd
 
/
past and past participle of bind.

adjective

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1 [in combination] Restricted or confined to a specified place: his job kept him city-bound
1.1Prevented from operating normally by the specified conditions: blizzard-bound Boston
More example sentences
  • Traditionally, they are duty bound to defer to the wishes of their parents.
  • Then you're duty bound to do the right thing so you just do what you're told and get on with it.
  • The Department was duty bound to protect the interests of the members who had contributed to this amount.
2 [with infinitive] Certain to be or to do or have something: there is bound to be a change of plan
Synonyms
certain, sure, very likely, destined, predestined, fated
2.1Obliged by law, circumstances, or duty to do something: I’m bound to do what I can to help Sam I’m bound to say that I have some doubts
Synonyms
obligated, obliged, under obligation, compelled, required, duty-bound, honour-bound, constrained; pledged, committed
3 [in combination] (Of a book) having a specified binding: fine leather-bound books
4(Of a grammatical element) occurring only in combination with another form.
More example sentences
  • And that left a lot of people feeling anxiously that they were never allowed to use ‘they’ as a bound pronoun even when they needed to.
  • Not only this, but word formation in English, generally, consists in the addition of a bound affix to the end of a stem, with the affix functioning as the head of the complex form.
  • Pidginization can entail loss of all bound morphology, many free grammatical morphemes, and even a large part of the vocabulary.
4.1In Chomskyan linguistics, (of a reflexive, reciprocal, or other linguistic unit) dependent for its reference on another noun phrase in the same sentence.
More example sentences
  • Long-distance reflexivization refers to the phenomenon whereby a reflexive can be bound outside its local domain.
  • All nouns are bound by referents, and it is healthier to one's linguistic development to keep things less solid and grounded.
  • Thus, the pronouns in both conditional and relative clause donkey sentences cannot be understood as referring expressions nor as bound variables.

Phrases

bound up in

Focusing on to the exclusion of all else: she was too bound up in her own misery to care that other people were hurt

bound up with (or in)

Closely connected with or related to: democracy is bound up with a measure of economic and social equality
More example sentences
  • The outcome of an act of discipline is closely bound up with how a child experiences that relationship.
  • Let me warn you to remember that the salvation of your soul, and nothing less, is closely bound up with the subject.
  • It's too big a subject - too bound up with who I was, who I wanted to be and who I've become.
Synonyms
connected with, linked with, tied up with, united with, allied to, attached to, dependent on, reliant on

I'll be bound

British Used to emphasize that one is sure of something: she’s hatching more little plots, I’ll be bound!
More example sentences
  • Too busy eating Turkey Twizzlers, I'll be bound.
  • She wasn't picked for the band for her singing talents, I'll be bound.
  • But in ‘Bridgwater Fair,’ Sharp has effectively collated and rewritten two texts and cut out such dubious but enjoyable lines as ‘You'll get so drunk now I'll be bound / You'll roll and tumble on the ground.’

Definition of bound in: