Definition of bring in English:

bring

Line breaks: bring
Pronunciation: /brɪŋ
 
/

verb (past and past participle brought /brɔːt/)

[with object]
  • 2Cause (someone or something) to be in a particular state or condition: an economic policy that would have brought the country to bankruptcy I’ll give you an aspirin to bring down your temperature
    More example sentences
    • Dementia is a progressive and disabling condition that brings turmoil and anguish to those involved.
    • Whether these conditions exist or not depends on an agent bringing them into existence.
    • In hard conditions bold and decisive actions of even small groups can bring success.
  • 3Initiate (legal action) against someone: riot and conspiracy charges should be brought against them
    More example sentences
    • Valid criminal charges could be brought against the Church, and prosecuted, now, as I will explain.
    • There are very different degrees of seriousness to the charges that can be brought against a prisoner.
    • Until the end of the Second World War, legal proceedings could not be brought against the Crown as of right.
    Synonyms
    put forward, prefer, propose, present, submit, lay, initiate, introduce, institute, moot
  • 4 [usually with negative] (bring oneself to do something) Force oneself to do something unpleasant: she could not bring herself to mention it
    More example sentences
    • I forced the inevitable because I can't bring myself to compromise.
    • At first she was sure that he couldn't bring himself to mention the letter and let her down gently.
    • It has half a bad novel inside it so I've never quite brought myself to throw it out.
    Synonyms
    force oneself to, make oneself, bear to

Phrases

bring home the bacon

see bacon.

bring something home to

see home.

bring the house down

Make an audience laugh or applaud very enthusiastically: he could bring the house down with his dry humour
More example sentences
  • Nonetheless, the group seems fit for bringing the house down on this late summer night in Seattle.
  • You brought the house down and your testimony was direct and sincere.
  • The drum solo was thunderous and brought the house down.

bring it on

informal Used to express confidence in meeting a challenge.
More example sentences
  • If this means retroactive prosecution, I say bring it on.
  • If this is life then bring it on.
  • I'll be ready for any challenge you throw back at me. Bring it on!

bring something to bear

  • 1Exert influence or pressure so as to achieve a particular result: they brought pressure to bear on him to resign she had reservations about how much influence she could bring to bear
    More example sentences
    • And who, at this distance, can tell what pressures were brought to bear on ordinary citizens to make them conform.
    • NASA finally relented, but only after much pressure was brought to bear.
    • Another way that pressure can be brought to bear on offending nations is through economic sanctions.
    Synonyms
    apply, exert, administer, implement, use, exercise, employ, utilize, practise, put into practice, execute, prosecute, enact, carry out, put to use, bring into effect/play
  • 2Aim a weapon: he brought his rifle to bear on a distant target
    More example sentences
    • The others all brought their weapons up to bear.
    • This was the only suitable spot for bringing our guns to bear on the enemy, to assist in the attack.
    • Burchfield brought his guns to bear early in the Preface, with a broadside against the very book that he was editing.

bring someone to book

see book.

bring something to light

see light1.

bring someone/thing to mind

Cause one to remember or think of someone or something: all that marble brought to mind a mausoleum
More example sentences
  • You might start the conversation by simply stating what brings the issue to mind.
  • Why did the girl bring Victor to mind, Sarah wonders.
  • I have to say, at that stage, it did bring a question to mind of, what am I doing here?
Synonyms
remind one of, cause one to remember, make one think of, cause one to remember, put one in mind of, take one back to, bring/call to mind, awake one's memories of, evoke, call up, conjure up, summon up

bring something to pass

chiefly • literary Cause something to happen: any man must at some point question whether it is chance or fate that brings things to pass
More example sentences
  • Only the most crucial subjects brought such occasions to pass.
  • Some people think that visualizing the moment of achieving a desired goal can actually bring that moment to pass.
  • But there was no turning back; his hand had brought the events to pass.

bring something to the table (or party)

Contribute something of value to a discussion, project, etc.: consultants who can bring strategic thinking to the table
More example sentences
  • The question to ask is "what does each side bring to the table?"
  • David's intelligence should, in theory, complement what Chappell brings to the table.
  • Of course, simply bringing more women to the table will not eliminate all sexism in the news.

what brings you here?

For what reason have you come here?: so what brings you here at this time of night?
More example sentences
  • I'd like to know what brings you here at this hour of the night?
  • Sit down, man, and tell me what brings you here.
  • Now kindly state what brings you here.

Phrasal verbs

bring something about

  • 2Cause a ship to head in a different direction: he brought the ship about in a stylish tack
    More example sentences
    • They sailed out to sea, brought the ship about, and entered the harbour from the East.
    • The pilots brought their ships about and at the same time killed their thrust.
    • After flying a little way out he brought the ship about and slowed to the lowest throttle setting.
    Synonyms
    turn, turn round/around, reverse, reverse the direction of, change the direction of

bring something back

Reintroduce something: bringing back capital punishment would solve nothing
More example sentences
  • The Chief Minister proposes to bring the zing back into the capital's nightlife
  • When capital starts to flee, it can be brought back by tax cuts, deregulation, privatization, etc.
  • She will bring the policy back for review in about two weeks.
Synonyms
Cause something to return: the smell of the tiny church brought back every memory of my childhood
More example sentences
  • To start with Louis embarked on a policy to bring the Huguenots back to the Catholic Church.
  • Pictures of Jonathon and me were hanging all over the tree house bringing the memories back harder then ever.
  • Laughter filled the lodge as happy memories were brought back.
Synonyms
remind one of, put one in mind of, bring/call to mind, cause one to recall, make one think of, take one back to, awaken (one's) memories of; conjure up, suggest, evoke, summon up, call up

bring someone down

Cause someone to lose power: the vote will not bring down the government
More example sentences
  • She fervently hoped to see Arlan lose, to bring him down from atop his pedestal.
  • After more than 400 years of power, the Kingdom was brought down by invading armies.
  • There is the potential to upset the balance in the industry and bring this company down.
Synonyms
overthrow, depose, oust, unseat, overturn, topple, cause to fall, pull down, lay low
Cause someone to fall over, especially by tackling them during a football or rugby match: Harris was brought down by Palmer on the edge of the box
More example sentences
  • Sean laughed and chased me, bringing me down with a rugby tackle a short distance away.
  • The tackle brought him down and they both fell to the floor with a thump.
  • She barreled into me and brought me down, knocking the wind out of me.
Synonyms
Make someone unhappy: she was in such a good mood I couldn’t bear to bring her down
More example sentences
  • I thought that maybe it was Peter's depression bringing her down.
  • These members bring me down more then any of the issues from the last two years.
  • Not winning will depress his fans more than it will bring him down, because his despair is constant.
Synonyms
depress, sadden, make sad/unhappy, upset, cast down, get down, make desolate, deject, dispirit, dishearten, discourage, weigh down, dampen the spirits of, oppress

bring someone/thing down

Cause someone or something to fall over by shooting them: too bad he couldn’t bring the bear down with a clean shot
More example sentences
  • This one of the sort had a long bolt-it was for bringing a grisly bear down.
  • He fought his excitement, trying to line up a shot that would bring the bear down.
  • The shot that had brought him down had lodged in his thigh.

bring something forth

archaic Give birth to something: why does Elsbeth not bring forth a child?
More example sentences
  • They shall curse the mothers who brought them forth.
  • She never conceived or brought forth a child.
  • The other female brought forth a child covered with the small-pox.

bring something forward

  • 1Move a meeting or event to an earlier date or time: the congress has been brought forward by a year
    More example sentences
    • Recent events may well bring this date forward.
    • However, given today's tragic events it may be that that this meeting is brought forward.
    • The next meeting of the guild has been brought forward by one week and is taking place on Monday, December 10.
  • 2 (often as adjective brought forward) (In bookkeeping) transfer a total sum from the bottom of one page to the top of the next: a profit and loss balance brought forward of £5,000,000
    More example sentences
    • The company's balance sheet to December 31, 2000 showed a loss brought forward of €3.23 million.
    • This statement shows two entries, with a balance brought forward of $104, 192.53.
    • He did not recollect checking the details on the second page, which amount was brought forward to the first page.

bring something in

  • 2(Of a jury) give a decision in court: the jury brought in a unanimous verdict
    More example sentences
    • The jury brought in a verdict that the cave-in in the tunnel was due to faulty design in the timbering.
    • This time the jury brought in a decision in favor of Scott, and the defense prepared an appeal.
    • The first claim was that he was innocent, and would continue to be, until a jury brought in a guilty verdict.

bring someone off

  • 1Rescue someone from a ship in difficulties: ‘Any men been brought off yet?’ Joe asked one of the fishermen on the beach
    More example sentences
    • It is a matter of deep regret that I was unable to bring off the four or five who were left, in spite of my efforts.
    • Jack received orders to try and bring off any of the crews which might have escaped from the wrecked ships.
  • 2 vulgar slang Give someone or oneself an orgasm.

bring something off

Achieve something successfully: a good omelette is very hard to bring off
More example sentences
  • It is part of something that they hope they never have to do but they bring it off successfully.
  • Rostropovich brings this live performance off most impressively.
  • He might have worked terribly hard to bring it off.
Synonyms

bring someone on

Encourage someone who is learning something to develop or improve: Mr Edom thought well of him, and was bringing him on
More example sentences
  • It can dramatically reduce the cost associated with bringing somebody on to a system.
  • There is no doubt in my mind that he will be a key part of the team that brings her on to greater heights.
  • When they feel it's appropriate, they'll bring her on.

bring something on

  • 2(Of the weather) promote the growth of crops.
    More example sentences
    • I would speculate that the cool weather we experienced the last three weeks brought them on.
    • Chocolate bloom develops naturally with time, but it can be brought on prematurely.
    • The combination of an early spring and warm sunny weather brought on ripening, and harvesting at the end of February.

bring someone out

  • 1Encourage someone to feel more confident: she needs friends to bring her out of herself
    More example sentences
    • ‘Thank you,’ he said encouragingly, hoping this would bring her out of her shell.
    • The camaraderie of colleagues has helped in bringing her out of herself.
    • Nate was someone he could have confided in and might have brought him out of his shell a bit more.
  • 2British Cause someone to go on strike: protest aimed at bringing out the miners who were still at work
    More example sentences
    • To bring out the workers who did not respond to the initial strike call, the union introduced a new tactic.
    • They spoke to the strikers and called on them to go to the nearby enterprises and bring out the workers there.

bring something out

bring someone round (or US around)

  • 1 (also bring someone to) Restore someone to consciousness: she administered artificial respiration and brought him round
    More example sentences
    • He spent six days in a coma at a specialist unit before doctors brought him round.
    • He managed to bring her round by talking to her and holding her but she couldn't move.
    • The flash of the camera brought me round from my trance.
    Synonyms
    wake up, return to consciousness, rouse, arouse, bring to

bring something to

Cause a boat to stop, especially by turning into the wind.
More example sentences
  • The helmsman complied, bringing the ship to.
  • When she was about eighty yards from the shoreline she swung the boat head to the wind bringing it to.
  • Still following the landing waypoints Rick brought the cruiser to.

bring up

(Chiefly of a ship) come to a stop.
More example sentences
  • The ship brought up as suddenly and violently as if she had struck a rock.
  • The next order followed; when the head sails were flattened and the ship brought up to the wind.
  • ‘Stern all’, Shouted the mate as the boat brought up against some object which we had not been able to see.

bring someone up

Look after a child until it is an adult: she was partly brought up by her maternal grandparents
More example sentences
  • He really had only one parent bringing him up for most of his life because his mother passed away when he was 12.
  • Since Rebecca's death, her son Jordan has been brought up by her mother and sisters.
  • Abandoned by the stricken father, Paolo had been brought up in his mother's home.
Synonyms
rear, raise, care for, take care of, look after, nurture, provide for; develop, mother, parent, foster, breed; educate, train, instruct
(be brought up) Be taught as a child to adopt particular behaviour or attitudes: he had been brought up to believe that marriage was forever
More example sentences
  • I was brought up to believe that it was impolite to discuss one's financial affairs in public.
  • I am 16 and I've been brought up to believe in God.
  • Suppose people in a given society were brought up to believe that women should be subservient to men.

bring something up

  • 1Vomit something: fortunately I brought up the poison
    More example sentences
    • What he saw hit him hard and he brought up his lunch.
    • My client brought up her lunch shortly after she ate.
    • I almost brought up my dinner last night watching the news.
  • 2Raise a matter for discussion or consideration: she tried repeatedly to bring up the subject of money
    More example sentences
    • I've considered bringing the matter up with my father but fear creating a rift.
    • He seemed to have resentment in his voice whenever the matter of the song was brought up.
    • A day passed before the subject of a plan was brought up and discussed.

Derivatives

bringer

noun
More example sentences
  • Do you see yourself as a bringer of enlightenment?
  • The bringer is always way worse than the person who actually ruins the party.
  • He seems to think of us as meddlers and bringers of danger.

Origin

Old English bringan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch brengen and German bringen.

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Pronunciation: ˌkələrəˈto͝orə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody