Definition of caprice in English:

caprice

Line breaks: ca|price
Pronunciation: /kəˈpriːs
 
/

noun

1A sudden and unaccountable change of mood or behaviour: her caprices made his life impossible [mass noun]: a land where men were ruled by law and not by caprice
More example sentences
  • Her narrative follows a loopy line traced more by mood and caprice than by causation or chronology.
  • Essentially, what has happened to O'Neill is no more than life, with all its vagaries and caprices.
  • Dip in, and let yourself be governed by mood and caprice.
Synonyms
2 Music another term for capriccio. the caprice was divided into a theme and eleven variations
More example sentences
  • Dubost had herself conceived the ballet as a musical caprice and had given the ten leaves of her fan to ten different composers asking each of them to compose a single dance number.
  • Studies for solo violin include Paganini's brilliant 24 caprices, which provided a fertile source of inspiration for other composers.
  • I was feeling the exhaustion keenly - but not enough to make a complete ass of myself during choir, which inched by like a violist playing Paganini caprices.

Origin

mid 17th century: from French, from Italian (see capriccio).

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Pronunciation: ˈflipənt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude