There are 2 main definitions of chat in English:

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chat1

Line breaks: chat
Pronunciation: /tʃat
 
/

verb (chats, chatting, chatted)

[no object]
1Talk in a friendly and informal way: she chatted to her mother on the phone every day
More example sentences
  • The giant woman sat with them for a while, bartering and chatting in a friendly and motherly way.
  • Minutes before he arrived, Charlotte had been sober, and was chatting to her friend.
  • At home she likes it cosy: snuggling up on a sofa with a book, chatting to friends.
Synonyms
talk, gossip, chatter, chitter-chatter, speak, converse, have a conversation, engage in conversation, tittle-tattle, prattle, jabber, jibber-jabber, babble, prate, go on, run on;
Scottish & Irish slabber
informal gas, have a confab, jaw, chew the rag, chew the fat, yap, yak, yackety-yak, yabber, gabber, yatter, yammer, powwow
British informal natter, witter, rabbit, chunter, waffle, have a chinwag, chinwag
North American informal shoot the breeze, shoot the bull, visit
Australian/New Zealand informal mag
formal confabulate
archaic twaddle, twattle, clack, claver
1.1Exchange messages online in real time with one or more simultaneous users of a computer network: I have chatted to a few women on the Net
More example sentences
  • Unable to meet their friends in person, they chat online instead.
  • Nor is inflection, tone or humour easily communicated by texting, chatting or email.
  • He spends two to three hours a day chatting.

noun

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1An informal conversation: he dropped in for a chat [mass noun]: that’s enough chat for tonight
More example sentences
  • There have been many similar wine-fuelled conversations, conspiratorial chats over coffee, or long-winded email dialogues.
  • How do they like to communicate - by e-mail, voicemail or an informal chat when you drop by their office?
  • Last week you were having cosy, informal chats in their office, now you're getting the brush-off whenever you try to instigate a meeting.
Synonyms
Indian adda
informal jaw, gas, confab, gabber
British informal natter, chinwag, rabbit
Scottish & Northern English informal crack
North American informal rap, bull session, gabfest
Australian informal convo
rare colloquy
1.1The online exchange of messages in real time with one or more simultaneous users of a computer network: online chat has been widely accepted by average Internet users [count noun]: you can have four simultaneous chats online at once
More example sentences
  • Unlike e-mail, which can cost up to 85% less than a phone call, chat doesn't save much.
  • MSN Messenger 4.7 (which comes standard with Windows XP) does not log chats.
  • Provide multiple ways (1-800 number, email, live chat) to connect with your company.

Origin

Middle English: shortening of chatter.

More
  • In medieval times chat was formed as a shorter version of chatter, which itself started life as an imitation of the sound made by people chatting away, rather as jabber (Late Middle English) and twitter (Late Middle English) imitated the sound they described. The chattering classes are liberal, well-educated people, often working in the media, who are fond of expressing their views on any and every subject. This name for them has been around since at least the early 1980s. The success of the website called Twitter has led to heated debate among users as to whether what they do should be called to twitter or to tweet (mid 19th century)—yet another word imitating the sound of birds. See also jargon

Phrasal verbs

chat someone up

1
informal Engage someone in flirtatious conversation: the waiter attempted to chat her up
More example sentences
  • ‘He wouldn't let her go out for meals because she might be chatted up by other people or she might chat them up,’ he explained.
  • Two girls join your table and start chatting you up.
  • And they're not chatting you up because they think you're attractive.
Synonyms
flirt with, make up to, make advances to, make overtures to, romance
informal come on to, give the come-on to, make (sheep's) eyes at, be all over

Definition of chat in:

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There are 2 main definitions of chat in English:

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chat2

Line breaks: chat
Pronunciation: /tʃat
 
/

noun

1 [often in combination] A small Old World songbird of the thrush family, with black, white, and brown coloration and a harsh call.
Example sentences
  • Old World warblers and chats are an excellent representative system to test these hypotheses.
  • I also caught the only Kentucky Warbler of the day, a Yellow-breasted Chat.
2 [with modifier] Any of a number of small songbirds with harsh calls:
Example sentences
  • I could wait until late May and maybe find a mourning warbler or a yellow-breasted chat.
  • Breeding productivity for riparian associated songbirds (e.g., Song Sparrow, Yellow Warbler, and Yellow-breasted Chat) are at levels high enough to maintain viable populations.

Origin

late 17th century: probably imitative of its call.

More
  • In medieval times chat was formed as a shorter version of chatter, which itself started life as an imitation of the sound made by people chatting away, rather as jabber (Late Middle English) and twitter (Late Middle English) imitated the sound they described. The chattering classes are liberal, well-educated people, often working in the media, who are fond of expressing their views on any and every subject. This name for them has been around since at least the early 1980s. The success of the website called Twitter has led to heated debate among users as to whether what they do should be called to twitter or to tweet (mid 19th century)—yet another word imitating the sound of birds. See also jargon

Definition of chat in:

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