There are 6 main definitions of chuck in English:

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chuck1

Line breaks: chuck
Pronunciation: /tʃʌk
 
/
informal

verb

[with object]
1Throw (something) carelessly or casually: someone chucked a brick through the window figurative chucking money at the problem won’t solve it
More example sentences
  • There's amusement in his eyes as he strides into the room casually chucking his jacket over the back of the sofa.
  • People in the town feed these pigeons and until they stop chucking food about we will not get rid of them.
  • But I also agree with him that the second may be a bit more positive than just the government chucking money at traffic jams.
Synonyms
let fly with
informal heave, sling, bung, buzz, whang
North American informal peg
Australian informal hoy
New Zealand informal bish
1.1 Cricket (Of a bowler) deliver (a ball) with an unlawful action.
Example sentences
  • He made the point that intelligent bowlers did not chuck every ball.
  • The conclusion that all bowlers chuck at varying degrees has stupefied a section of opinion, notably the Australians.
  • According to the International Cricket Council, ninety-nine per cent of all test bowlers chuck!
1.2 (often chuck something away/out) Throw (something) away: they make a living out of stuff people chuck away
More example sentences
  • The pleasure of having a disk that is brimming to capacity, chucking it out and throwing in a new one that's 5 times the size is immeasurable.
  • A former Dutch prosecutor, who resigned last year after it emerged he had chucked his old PC out with the trash is in trouble again.
  • Besides, I felt relieved as I didn't have to chuck the stuff away.
Synonyms
2End a relationship with (a partner): Mary chucked him for another guy
More example sentences
  • McFadden has been through a lot: painfully and publicly dumped by her husband, then chucked again by the publicity-seeking Dan Corsi.
  • For the most part, it's about getting back at people who chucked you.
  • He becomes homesick, his girlfriend chucks him for a Tannadice midfielder, he takes to drink and gives up the game.
Synonyms
leave, throw over, drop, finish with, stop going out with, break off one's relationship with, desert, abandon, leave high and dry
informal dump, ditch, give someone the elbow, walk out on, run out on, leave flat
British informal give someone the push, give someone the big E, bin off
dated jilt
archaic forsake
2.1Give up (a job or activity): Richard chucked in his course
More example sentences
  • That's when the Minish athlete chucked in her pensionable job for the hard world of professional athletics, but she has been an admirable student since then.
  • Oh, and did I mention that 12 months prior I had chucked in a cushy job in a University Science department to pursue this dream?
  • Freshly enrolled in Ballyfermot senior college in Dublin, the former waiter knew he was right to have chucked in his old job and turned his hand to journalism.
Synonyms
2.2 (chuck it) dated Stop doing something: chuck it, Ross!
More example sentences
  • I can understand why Sir Alex Ferguson is not chucking it.
  • He didn't have a problem that way, because at least I wasn't seen to be chucking it.
  • To adapt G. K. Chesterton's advice to another public worthy: chuck it, Hockney.

noun

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1A throw.
Example sentences
  • Needless to say, the effort of the big chuck caused me to throw coils of line all over the place, so I stopped to sort myself out.
2 (the chuck) British A dismissal or rejection: he’s still wondering why and how Mrs T got the chuck

Origin

late 17th century (as a verb): from chuck2.

More
  • This informal word meaning ‘throw’ is the same as the one meaning ‘touch (someone) playfully under the chin’, probably from Old French chuquer, ‘to knock, bump’ (of unknown ultimate origin). The chuck (late 17th century) of a drill is a variant of chock, with chunk (late 17th century) another variant. The phrase the chuck expressing rejection (give somebody the chuck) dates from the late 19th century, while the sense ‘to vomit’ is an Australianism from the mid 20th century.

Phrases

chuck it down

1
British Rain heavily.
Example sentences
  • For one thing, it's chucking it down with rain at the moment, so the warm evening sunshine is highly unlikely.
  • You'd go out in your shirt sleeves and it would chuck it down with rain, or you'd take your umbrella to work only to lose it on a park bench in the ensuing heatwave.
  • Abysmal weather today, it rained all day and absolutely chucked it down as I left work making driving home not much fun.

Phrasal verbs

chuck someone out

1
Force someone to leave a building: their landlord chucked them out last night
More example sentences
  • We couldn't believe how unprofessional he was - not to give some kind of formal warning first or have a meeting with us, but just to chuck us out immediately, two young girls on their own.
  • Later, despite his feeble protestations, she petulantly chucks him out.
  • She giggled about it and called over this big guy who chucked me out by the ear.

chuck up

2
Vomit: I nearly chucked up
More example sentences
  • Not because I'm a fan of marital harmony or anything, but because they both have completely noxious romantic subplots now, subplots that make me want to chuck up my dinner.
  • After a few weeks of chucking up and feeling generally awful, my mother asked me the $64,000 question, ‘Wendy, are you having a baby?’
  • No-one appeared to know I was chucking up thanks to Uncle Alcohol.

Derivatives

chucker

1
noun
Example sentences
  • Cricket history is replete with examples of chuckers - the most memorable for Indian fans being West Indian paceman Charlie Griffith whose bowling nearly killed Nari Contractor at Barbados in 1962.
  • Right now they all appear to be tarred with the same brush - albeit inadvertently innocent to say the least, given known chuckers in cricket were forced from the game down the years.
  • I don't want to name names, but you don't need to be a rocket scientist to work out who the chuckers are.

Words that rhyme with chuck

buck, Canuck, cluck, cruck, duck, fuck, luck, muck, pluck, puck, ruck, schmuck, shuck, struck, stuck, suck, truck, tuck, upchuck, yuck

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There are 6 main definitions of chuck in English:

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chuck2

Line breaks: chuck
Pronunciation: /tʃʌk
 
/

verb

[with object]
Touch (someone) playfully under the chin: he chucked the baby under its chin
More example sentences
  • ‘You won't go short!’ she says to her son in baby talk, chucking him under the chin.
  • Nicholas laughed and lightly chucked Susan under the chin.
  • She smiled wickedly and chucked him under the chin.

noun

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A playful touch under the chin: she gave him a good-natured chuck under the chin
More example sentences
  • But let's be clear there - a chuck under the chin is quite sufficient to convince me that affection can last the distance.
  • He gave the toddler a chuck under the chin which earned him a toothy grin.
  • Kelly reached forward and gave her a token chuck under the chin.

Origin

early 17th century (as a noun): probably from Old French chuquer, later choquer 'to knock, bump', of unknown ultimate origin.

More
  • This informal word meaning ‘throw’ is the same as the one meaning ‘touch (someone) playfully under the chin’, probably from Old French chuquer, ‘to knock, bump’ (of unknown ultimate origin). The chuck (late 17th century) of a drill is a variant of chock, with chunk (late 17th century) another variant. The phrase the chuck expressing rejection (give somebody the chuck) dates from the late 19th century, while the sense ‘to vomit’ is an Australianism from the mid 20th century.

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There are 6 main definitions of chuck in English:

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chuck3

Line breaks: chuck
Pronunciation: /tʃʌk
 
/

noun

1A device for holding a workpiece in a lathe or a tool in a drill, typically having three or four jaws that move radially in and out: a power-drill chuck a three-jaw chuck
More example sentences
  • One of the challenges of crank grinding relates to clamping the workpiece in the chuck so that the crank pin can be cylindrically ground.
  • To make the feet, the turner placed an offset chuck on the lathe and turned this part of the leg along a second axis.
  • Other keyless devices consist of rotating knobs (similar to a chuck on a drill) on the slide mechanism.
2 [mass noun] (also chuck steak) A cut of beef that extends from the neck to the ribs, typically used for stewing: the trays of fat-speckled chuck and sweetbreads had been put in the refrigerator
More example sentences
  • Shred about 10 ounces cooked beef brisket or chuck.
  • Cut the pork, venison, chuck steak and kielbasa sausage into 2.5cm / 1in cubes, then toss together in the flour.
  • Similarly, the steak and kidney pie is now made with best blade steak rather than chuck beef.

Origin

late 17th century, as a variant of chock; see also chunk1.

More
  • This informal word meaning ‘throw’ is the same as the one meaning ‘touch (someone) playfully under the chin’, probably from Old French chuquer, ‘to knock, bump’ (of unknown ultimate origin). The chuck (late 17th century) of a drill is a variant of chock, with chunk (late 17th century) another variant. The phrase the chuck expressing rejection (give somebody the chuck) dates from the late 19th century, while the sense ‘to vomit’ is an Australianism from the mid 20th century.

Definition of chuck in:

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There are 6 main definitions of chuck in English:

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chuck4

Syllabification: chuck

Entry from US English dictionary

noun

US informal
Food or provisions.

Origin

mid 19th century: perhaps the same word as chuck3.

More
  • This informal word meaning ‘throw’ is the same as the one meaning ‘touch (someone) playfully under the chin’, probably from Old French chuquer, ‘to knock, bump’ (of unknown ultimate origin). The chuck (late 17th century) of a drill is a variant of chock, with chunk (late 17th century) another variant. The phrase the chuck expressing rejection (give somebody the chuck) dates from the late 19th century, while the sense ‘to vomit’ is an Australianism from the mid 20th century.

Definition of chuck in:

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There are 6 main definitions of chuck in English:

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chuck5

Line breaks: chuck
Pronunciation: /tʃʌk
 
/

noun

Northern English informal
Used as a friendly form of address: ‘Can I help you at all, chuck?’
More example sentences
  • I was wearing my tattered skirt with a black belt, my chucks, and a really weird purple Sex pistols shirt that I found in the garbage somewhere.

Origin

late 16th century: alteration of chick1.

More
  • This informal word meaning ‘throw’ is the same as the one meaning ‘touch (someone) playfully under the chin’, probably from Old French chuquer, ‘to knock, bump’ (of unknown ultimate origin). The chuck (late 17th century) of a drill is a variant of chock, with chunk (late 17th century) another variant. The phrase the chuck expressing rejection (give somebody the chuck) dates from the late 19th century, while the sense ‘to vomit’ is an Australianism from the mid 20th century.

Definition of chuck in:

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There are 6 main definitions of chuck in English:

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chuck6

Syllabification: chuck

Entry from US English dictionary

noun

Short for woodchuck.

Definition of chuck in:

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