Definition of civic in English:

civic

Line breaks: civic
Pronunciation: /ˈsɪvɪk
 
/

adjective

1Relating to a city or town, especially its administration; municipal: a meeting of civic and business leaders
More example sentences
  • Such concerns pushed civic leaders toward municipal control of those networks.
  • Perhaps a few people involved in civic administration might feel more important if we became a city but I oppose the idea.
  • Why has a city of 14 million allowed a civic administration of a few thousand to hold it to ransom?
Synonyms
1.1Relating to the duties or activities of people in relation to their town, city, or local area: he was active in the civic life of Swindon
More example sentences
  • The aim of the competition is to recognise improvements made by local communities to create civic pride in their area.
  • There is no older civic duty than public participation in the law.
  • The least satisfactory aspect concerned the civic virtue of locals.

Origin

mid 16th century: from French civique or Latin civicus, from civis 'citizen'. The original use was in civic garland, crown, etc., translating Latin corona civica, denoting a garland of oak leaves and acorns given in ancient Rome to a person who saved a fellow citizen's life.

Derivatives

civically

adverb
More example sentences
  • This ignorance and lack of involvement civically is a problem for a functioning democracy, which requires participation of the governed.
  • If not civically engaged, what is one's status in a democratic society?
  • Extracurricular activities have long been known to contribute to students' tendencies to become and remain civically engaged, even after decades have passed.

More definitions of civic

Definition of civic in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day grammarian
Pronunciation: grəˈme(ə)rēən
noun
a person who studies and writes about grammar