Definition of coerce in English:

coerce

Line breaks: co¦erce
Pronunciation: /kəʊˈəːs
 
/

verb

[with object]

Derivatives

coercer

noun
More example sentences
  • Since nearly all coercion is morally suspect, and much of it legally punishable, successful coercers will not want to testify.
  • For so long I was a coercer, an enabler, a bad influence.
  • The coercers of the forced girls in this study kept them in control with violence, deception, indebtedness, and affection.

coercible

adjective
More example sentences
  • When one is weak and the other strong, when one is coercible by virtue of this weakness and the other holds all the cards, competition inevitably becomes exploitation.
  • There can surely no longer be any justification for a law that treats wives as being more coercible than unmarried women.
  • A person already in jail is not shocked and coercible as someone newly arrested might be.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin coercere 'restrain', from co- 'together' + arcere 'restrain'.

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Pronunciation: ˌkələrəˈto͝orə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody