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college

Line breaks: col|lege
Pronunciation: /ˈkɒlɪdʒ
 
/

Definition of college in English:

noun

1An educational institution or establishment, in particular:
Example sentences
  • For example, when Ataturk was bringing modern Turkey into being, he closed down all the madrasas, the colleges of further education.
  • Pupils will be able to spend time in work placements and further education colleges, as well as in school.
  • The college was re-opened more than a decade later as a college of continuing education.
1.1One providing higher education or specialized professional or vocational training: colleges of further education I’m at college, studying graphic design
More example sentences
  • Also, men and women who did not go to college after finishing high school were not included in the sample.
  • The whole system here is from high school through to colleges through to the professional leagues, is all designed to develop those top 100 players.
  • At college, his professors thought he was crazy to be in school because he could make a lot more money as a bricklayer.
Synonyms
educational institution, training establishment, centre of learning, seat of learning;
school, academy, university, institute, seminary, conservatory, conservatoire
historical polytechnic
1.2(In Britain) any of the independent institutions into which certain universities are separated, each having its own teaching staff, students, and buildings: the Oxford colleges [in names]: Trinity College, Cambridge
More example sentences
  • Sustainable sources such as solar and hydroelectric energy are now used to power many of the university's buildings and colleges.
  • Much of the mystique of Oxford lies in the ancient and beautiful buildings of the colleges of the university.
  • With a few exceptions, all are students from various colleges of Delhi University and some even from schools.
1.3British A private secondary school: [in names]: Eton College
More example sentences
  • Some private schools and colleges still reject the public school position which consists of accepting the standard of the age and teaching political correctness.
  • This sort of curriculum was strongest in the private colleges and state high schools, opening for many of their pupils a pathway to the professions.
  • St James's Street CBS and the Institute of Education run repeat Leaving Cert classes as do as many other public and private schools and colleges.
1.4US A university offering a limited curriculum or teaching only to a bachelor’s degree: [in names]: Harvard College
More example sentences
  • The survey looked at students who had graduated with a degree, a diploma or a certificate from a college or university bachelor's program.
  • Many colleges have degree completion programs designed to help adult learners finish what they started.
  • The students hail from 35 states, and the college offers associates and bachelor of arts degrees.
1.5The teaching staff and students of a college considered collectively: the college was shocked by his death
2An organized group of professional people with particular aims, duties, and privileges: [in names]: the Royal College of Physicians
More example sentences
  • While doctors have influenced world events by personal interaction, and can do so again, the involvement of our professional organisations and colleges has generally been perfunctory.
  • We need to set our own house in order and should all be striving to foster working environments free of bullies, whether in our hospitals, practices, professional organisations, or colleges.
  • An audit represents systematic monitoring of specific aspects of care; it is somewhat formal, being set up and organised by national colleges and regional committees.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin collegium 'partnership', from collega 'partner in office', from col- 'together with' + legare 'depute'.

Words that rhyme with college

acknowledge, foreknowledge, knowledge

Definition of college in:

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