Definition of commander in English:

commander

Line breaks: com|mand¦er
Pronunciation: /kəˈmɑːndə
 
/

noun

1A person in authority, especially over a body of troops or a military operation: the commander of a paratroop regiment
More example sentences
  • Society and the state evidence the need for the emergence of and functioning of military leaders, commanders, who enjoy authority.
  • This precedent focuses on military commanders conducting operations that affect the surrounding civilian population.
  • Without this war declaration, military commanders have no command authority over contractor personnel.
Synonyms
leader, head, headman, boss, chief, director, manager, overseer, controller, master; commander-in-chief, C.-in-C., commanding officer, CO, officer, captain
informal boss man, skipper, number one, top dog, kingpin, bigwig, Mr Big, big cheese
British informal gaffer, guv'nor
North American informal numero uno, sachem, big white chief, big wheel, head honcho, honcho, big kahuna, high muckamuck
1.1A rank of naval officer, above lieutenant commander and below captain.
More example sentences
  • Warren served in the navy for five years, and was described by his senior naval commanders as a superior able seaman.
  • This contrasted sharply with the situation of the opposing commander, Admiral Villeneuve.
  • Incidentally, this pattern was that worn by captains and commanders from 1832-1939.
1.2An officer in charge of a Metropolitan Police district in London.
More example sentences
  • They then appointed their own commanders in the police stations.
  • His assessment of the violence was backed by the district police commander for North Belfast.
  • The sergeant has taken over the role of section commander at Tidworth police station.
2A member of a higher class in some orders of knighthood. See also knight commander.
More example sentences
  • He was made a chevalier of the Legion of Honour by his second country in 1896 and a commander of the order in 1933.
  • Singer Rod Stewart, seen here at a 2004 London concert, will be made a Commander of the British Empire.
  • The professor, who has worked at Imperial College since 1970 was made Commander of the Order of the British Empire for his services to Population Ecology.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French comandeor, from late Latin commandare (see command).

Derivatives

commandership

noun
More example sentences
  • He liked you enough to reward your services to the medical profession, as you had been in the trade for some time, with a commandership of the British empire.
  • It will undertake the responsibility of commandership in the region in April.
  • For example, it was said of W. H. Gibson on one occasion that if he wanted the commandership for a coming encampment, it was ‘goodbye’ for the rest of the candidates.

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Pronunciation: ˌintərˈnesēn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict