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commensurate

Line breaks: com|men¦sur|ate
Pronunciation: /kəˈmɛnʃ(ə)rət
 
, -sjə-/

Definition of commensurate in English:

adjective

Corresponding in size or degree; in proportion: salary will be commensurate with age and experience such heavy responsibility must receive commensurate reward
More example sentences
  • We needed to consider whether the degree of force used was commensurate with the degree of risk which he believed to be created by the threatened attack.
  • So I'd like to see a massive investment by governments which would be commensurate with the size of the problem.
  • The sample size is commensurate with related studies reported in the literature.
Synonyms

Origin

mid 17th century: from late Latin commensuratus, from com- 'together' + mensuratus, past participle of mensurare 'to measure'.

Derivatives

commensurately

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • Yes, it's interesting that increasingly large companies in the public sector are offering people the opportunity to buy extra leave, and they reduce their pay commensurately.
  • I make no apologies whatsoever for paying him commensurately for that performance,’ he said.
  • As we report elsewhere in Scotland on Sunday, it will show that while life expectancy in Scotland will increase slightly over coming years, the quality of that life will not grow commensurately.

commensurateness

2
noun

Words that rhyme with commensurate

pastorate

Definition of commensurate in:

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