Definition of conker in English:

conker

Line breaks: con¦ker
Pronunciation: /ˈkɒŋkə
 
/

noun

British
1The hard, shiny dark brown nut of a horse chestnut tree.
More example sentences
  • It's a beautiful thing, the leather rich brown and shiny as a conker and trimmed with brass.
  • An old date book, a leaf from a tree in Greece, a conker from Paris, a knife stolen from the Ritz, part of a love letter, etc. - all are carefully arranged to create the best effect.
  • These ranged from the traditional knockabout with a conker on a string, to a conkernut shy, a play on the coconut version, and wingseed throwing.
1.1 (conkers) [treated as singular] A children’s game in which each has a conker on the end of a string and takes turns in trying to break another’s with it.
More example sentences
  • Back at the cottage and among wine, rakia and music we played the traditional game of cracking one another's Easter eggs together, something like the game of conkers in England.
  • Why can't the servants of the nanny state stick to outlawing other white-knuckle sports, like the games of conkers they've been targeting over the past few days?
  • Or, out in the playground, compete in a game of conkers, marbles and - if you are up for it - hopscotch and skipping.

Origin

mid 19th century (a dialect word denoting a snail shell, with which the game, or a form of it, was originally played): perhaps from conch, but associated with (and frequently spelled) conquer in the 19th and early 20th cents: an alternative name was conquerors.

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adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected