Definition of connate in English:

connate

Line breaks: con|nate
Pronunciation: /ˈkɒneɪt
 
/

adjective

1 Philosophy (Especially of ideas or principles) existing in a person or thing from birth; innate: are our ethical values connate?
More example sentences
  • The fact that compassion is both voluntary and learned differentiates it from other kinds of suffering, which are involuntary and connate.
2 Biology (Of parts) united so as to form a single part.
More example sentences
  • Five united stamens are adnate to the top of the pistil, which is made up of five connate carpels.
  • In young flowers all the carpels are connate at the base, and each mature mericarp represents a single carpel rather than half a carpel as is the case in Lamiaceae and Boraginaceae.
  • Sepals and petals are usually similar in form and free, but the lateral sepals may be connate to different degrees, forming a spur.
3 Geology (Of water) trapped in sedimentary rock during its deposition.
More example sentences
  • This water is thought to be associated with condensation from the ventilation system or connate water from the salt itself.
  • In addition, he determined that the Na / K ratios of the included fluids were low, suggesting that the minerals were deposited from hydrothermal solutions of meteoric rather than connate origin.
  • The origin of the vein-forming fluids - whether magmatic, meteoric, or connate - may also be determined from a study of the oxygen isotopes of the inclusions.

Origin

mid 17th century: from late Latin connatus, past participle of connasci, from con- 'together' + nasci 'be born'.

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Pronunciation: nēˈätn-ē
noun
retention of juvenile features in the adult animal