Definition of connubial in English:

connubial

Line breaks: con|nu¦bial
Pronunciation: /kəˈnjuːbɪəl
 
/

adjective

literary
Relating to marriage or the relationship of husband and wife; conjugal: their connubial bed
More example sentences
  • His armpits start smelling of meat; he becomes an urban caveman, forever subjecting Russia to ‘the detailed exaction of his connubial rights’.
  • At a time when tabloid headlines and reality TV shows make a nightly travesty of eternal devotion and connubial bliss, queer sweethearts have provided the season's most sincere and sentimental romantic comedy.
  • Look for ‘scholarly’ studies in the years to come, tracing every blip in the Canadian divorce rate to the gays and their subversive connubial happiness.

Origin

mid 17th century: from Latin connubialis, from connubium 'marriage', from con- 'with' + nubere 'marry'.

Derivatives

connubiality

Pronunciation: /-bɪˈalɪti/
noun
More example sentences
  • So if you practice Catholicism, and wish to remain a Catholic, you must honor the connubiality of the Eucharist.
  • People are now aware that maintaining a marriage requires skill, and no longer believe stable connubiality depends merely on a marriage license and children.
  • No matter our culture, class, connubiality, community, or conviviality we as Christians are unified in our profession of Christ as Lord.

connubially

adverb
More example sentences
  • And off they go and connubially link themselves without even having the banns read.
  • I don't use this phrase to condemn anyone who becomes connubially blissful, by the way.
  • Many of them, upon arriving in the United States, chose to attach themselves to the community, religiously, connubially, geographically, or occupationally, expanding its size even further.

Definition of connubial in:

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Pronunciation: ˈgəzəl
verb
eat or drink (something) greedily