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copulate Line breaks: copu|late
Pronunciation: /ˈkɒpjʊleɪt/

Definition of copulate in English:

verb

[no object]
Have sexual intercourse: only the dominant male copulates with the female after about twenty minutes, they copulate again
More example sentences
  • Males typically respond to persistent female sexual initiation by mounting and copulating with the female.
  • As adults, men look at porn because they are, ‘unnaturally’ one might say, hormonally driven to copulate with multiple partners but unable to do so.
  • So if we have one man and one woman who copulate in the standard way, and not in any kind of other way that we find troubling, then they can raise children.
Synonyms
mate, couple, breed;
have sex, have sexual intercourse, make love, sleep together, go to bed
informaldo it, do the business, go all the way, make whoopee, have one's way, bed, know someone in the biblical sense, tumble
British informalbonk, get one's oats
North American informalboff, get it on
euphemisticbe intimate
vulgar slangfuck, screw, bang, lay, get one's leg over, shaft, dick, frig, do, have, hump, poke, shtup, dip one's wick, ride, service, tup
British vulgar slanghave it away, have it off, shag, knob, get one's end away, knock someone off, give someone one, roger, grind, stuff
Scottish vulgar slangpodger
North American vulgar slangball, jump, jump someone's bones, bone, pork, diddle, nail
Australian/New Zealand vulgar slangroot
archaiclie together, possess, swive, know

Derivatives

copulatory

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • The penis serves as an outlet for urine and semen and as a copulatory organ.
  • Throughout the study period, all mounting behavior and complete copulatory sequences (those involving intromission and ejaculation) were recorded during critical incident sampling.
  • For each male, we used the number of observed copulations as an estimate of his total copulatory success.

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense 'join'): from Latin copulat- 'fastened together', from the verb copulare, from copula (see copula).

More
  • couple from Middle English:

    This comes via Old French from Latin copulare formed from co- ‘together’ and apere ‘fasten’. The term couplet (late 16th century) used in poetry for a pair of successive (usually rhyming) lines, means literally ‘little pair’. Copulate (Late Middle English) at first meant ‘join’ and is from the same source.

Words that rhyme with copulate

populate

Definition of copulate in:

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