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crochet

Line breaks: cro|chet
Pronunciation: /ˈkrəʊʃeɪ
 
, -ʃi/

Definition of crochet in English:

noun

[mass noun]
1A handicraft in which yarn is made up into a textured fabric by means of a hooked needle: [as modifier]: a crochet hook
More example sentences
  • Just to the right of the tent, you would have found a group of eight women poised with their crochet hooks and knitting needles.
  • I laid the blanket I had crocheted before I came to New France on my bed and put my knitting needles and crochet hooks in my workbag and then put it in the trunk.
  • Do you have any statistics that support this, and any details on what type of people are picking up the knitting needles and crochet hooks these days?
1.1Crocheted fabric or items: the bikini is tiny, three triangles of cotton crochet
More example sentences
  • The Federation Shield for craft was won by Mrs. Breda Phelan, for her beautiful cotton crochet tablecloth.
  • Also on display are soft wood toys and dolls, puppets and lampshades in leather, ceramic and terracotta pottery, crochet laces, cotton durries, silver filigree and tribal embroidery.
  • Grown-up gypsy chic can be found in spades there, where chiffon skirts offer a dressier alternative to cotton, alongside good-quality crochet shrugs in turquoise and raspberry.

verb (crochets /ˈkrəʊʃeɪz/, crocheting /-ʃeɪɪŋ/, crocheted /-ʃeɪd/)

[with object] Back to top  
Make (a garment or piece of fabric) using crochet: she had crocheted the shawl herself [no object]: her mother had stopped crocheting
More example sentences
  • When I pause in typing to think about the next sentence, I am crocheting a scarf that I promised to mail tomorrow.
  • She crocheted this scarf.
  • Queen Mary's Irish lace wedding dress was reputedly crocheted by three ladies from Foxpoint.

Origin

mid 19th century: from French, diminutive of croc 'hook', from Old Norse krókr.

More
  • croquet from (mid 19th century):

    Different as they seem, croquet and crochet (mid 19th century) are probably the same word. Croquet is thought to be a form of French crochet ‘hook, shepherd's crook’, which can mean ‘hockey stick’ in parts of France, and in English refers to a handicraft in which yarn is made up into fabric with a hooked needle. The lawn game in which you drive balls through hoops with a mallet seems to have been invented in France but introduced to Ireland, from where it spread to England in the 1850s and quickly became a popular sport among the aristocracy. The French word is also the source of the musical note called the crotchet (Middle English), from its shape, and also the old-fashioned term meaning a perverse belief, a hooked or twisted point of view, in use since Middle English, and giving us the term crotchety in the early 19th century.

Derivatives

crocheter

1
Pronunciation: /ˈkrəʊʃeɪə/
noun
Example sentences
  • This would also work for knitters and crocheters, as a yarn storage solution.
  • The council does not distinguish between knitting and crocheting, nor does it report the number of men who are skilled knitters or crocheters.
  • There are department-store tents of amateur watercolourists, amateur kiddie crocheters, flower dryers, mud turners, cancerous candle makers, rag-doll knotters and metal benders.

Words that rhyme with crochet

touchéricochetPinochet

Definition of crochet in:

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