There are 2 main definitions of curry in English:

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curry1

Line breaks: curry
Pronunciation: /ˈkʌri
 
/

noun (plural curries)

A dish of meat, vegetables, etc., cooked in an Indian-style sauce of strong spices: we went out for a curry a beef curry [mass noun]: she wouldn’t eat curry
More example sentences
  • The foods served in the Balti pan are freshly cooked aromatically spiced curries.
  • Lunch consists of rice served with vegetable and meat curries and sauces such as sambol, a spicy mixture of grated coconut and chili, peppers, pickles, and chutneys.
  • Malays eat rice with fish or meat curry and vegetables cooked in various ways.

verb (curries, currying, curried)

[with object] (usually as adjective curried) Back to top  
Prepare or flavour with a sauce of hot-tasting spices: curried chicken
More example sentences
  • The chef chooses quality and safe cuts of beef from Australia to prepare Western and Asian dishes that are curried, barbecued, braised, grilled, roasted or stewed.
  • Meat and poultry eaters can select from succulently prepared lamb chops, curried or stir fried chicken, baby back ribs and beef tenderloin.
  • Suggestions for fillings include curried chicken salad, or any other sandwich filling or vegetable combination.

Origin

late 16th century: from Tamil kaṟi.

More
  • The curry that you eat comes from kari, a word meaning ‘sauce’ in the South Indian and Sri Lankan language Tamil. Travellers were bringing back tales of this spicy new food as early as 1598, and in 1747 a book called The Art of Cookery told its readers how ‘To make a Currey the Indian way’. See also vindaloo If you curry favour you try to win favour by flattering someone and behaving obsequiously. The expression dates from the early 16th century and has nothing at all to do with Indian cuisine. It comes from a different word, also spelled curry, meaning ‘to groom a horse with a coarse brush or comb’, which came into Middle English from Old French. Curry favour itself is an alteration of the medieval form curry favel. Favel or Fauvel was the name of a horse in a 14th-century French tale who became a symbol of cunning and deceit. So ‘to groom Favel’ came to mean to handle him in just as cunning a way, by flattering him or behaving in an ingratiating way.

Words that rhyme with curry

dhurrie, flurry, hurry, Murray, scurry, slurry, surrey, worry

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There are 2 main definitions of curry in English:

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curry2

Line breaks: curry
Pronunciation: /ˈkʌri
 
/

verb (curries, currying, curried)

[with object]
1chiefly North American Groom (a horse) with a curry comb: I was brushing and currying the horse
More example sentences
  • Heaven help the poor kid who had to go in there, muck the floor, and curry the horse.
  • Now he had to curry all the horses, and to clean out their shoes.
  • With superb quickness she curried off the horse, who's winter coat had yet to shed out.
2 historical Treat (tanned leather) to improve its properties: I made the deer’s hide be curried and dressed by a tanner
More example sentences
  • The hide was first stretched on a variety of different frames, depending on the type of leather to be curried.
  • Also, while it sounds like curried grain leather would work, I cannot find it used in this context, so I can't recommend it either.
3 archaic Thrash; beat: he swore he would curry his hide

Origin

Middle English: from Old French correier, ultimately of Germanic origin.

More
  • The curry that you eat comes from kari, a word meaning ‘sauce’ in the South Indian and Sri Lankan language Tamil. Travellers were bringing back tales of this spicy new food as early as 1598, and in 1747 a book called The Art of Cookery told its readers how ‘To make a Currey the Indian way’. See also vindaloo If you curry favour you try to win favour by flattering someone and behaving obsequiously. The expression dates from the early 16th century and has nothing at all to do with Indian cuisine. It comes from a different word, also spelled curry, meaning ‘to groom a horse with a coarse brush or comb’, which came into Middle English from Old French. Curry favour itself is an alteration of the medieval form curry favel. Favel or Fauvel was the name of a horse in a 14th-century French tale who became a symbol of cunning and deceit. So ‘to groom Favel’ came to mean to handle him in just as cunning a way, by flattering him or behaving in an ingratiating way.

Phrases

curry favour

1
Ingratiate oneself with someone through obsequious behaviour: a wimpish attempt to curry favour with the new bosses
[alteration of Middle English curry favel, from the name (Favel or Fauvel) of a chestnut horse in a 14th-century French romance who became a symbol of cunning and duplicity; hence ‘to curry (or groom) Favel’ meant to use the cunning which he personified]
More example sentences
  • But for the man still in the post, the players have to place demands on themselves and not be overly concerned about doing the outgoing coach a favour or currying favour with his eventual replacement.
  • Conversely, but equally false, is the image of a toady who curries favor from higher-ups or someone who twists self-sacrifice into a self-serving art form.
  • The frenzy to pass as many Section 140 motions as possible in advance of the June 11 elections is all about currying favour with voters.

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