Definition of dimple in English:

dimple

Line breaks: dimple
Pronunciation: /ˈdɪmp(ə)l
 
/

noun

1A small depression in the flesh, either one that exists permanently or one that forms in the cheeks when one smiles.
More example sentences
  • This month I have memorized the curve of your smile, the dimples in your cheeks and forehead, the point at which the curls at the back of your head meet your neck.
  • Her smile cut deep dimples into each cheek and revealed pretty white teeth.
  • ‘Because we have the whole house to ourselves,’ I kissed his cheek and felt the dimples from his smile.
1.1A slight depression in the surface of an object: [as modifier]: a new golf ball, with a different dimple pattern
More example sentences
  • A slight dimple appeared on the calm surface of Lake Tahoma.
  • And believe it or not, the same dimple pattern on balls of different constructions will result in very different flights.
  • The 336 dimples in the surface of the outside cover of a golf ball impart a backspin that permits the ball to stay airborne twice as long as a smooth ball hit with the same force.
Synonyms

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Produce a dimple or dimples in the surface of: rain began to fall, dimpling the water
More example sentences
  • I too go in there, but so many skipjacks are dimpling the surface I return to the deep outside, believing the fish will be out, cruising.
  • The bottom is gray, sandy, silt actually dragged out from the land and ground up by the ice, its surface dimpled by countless millions of clams, all but their siphons buried.
  • To add interest to the surface and before fitting it over the plywood, we dimpled the copper (from the underside) using a hammer and nailset.
1.1 [no object] Form or show a dimple or dimples: she dimpled at Auguste (as adjective dimpled) her dimpled thighs
More example sentences
  • That dimpled, smiling, impish face belongs on a baby.
  • The man gave her an attractive, dimpled, smile and Stephanie began to feel a tiny bit better.
  • Her stern face dimpled into a sunny smile, thinking that Maria and Will were engaged.

Origin

Middle English: of Germanic origin; related to German Tümpel 'pond'.

Derivatives

dimply

adjective (dimplier, dimpliest)
More example sentences
  • By detoxifying the skin cells, the seaweed helps to reduce the dimply appearance of cellulite; iodine in the solution boosts the thyroid, which helps to accelerate the fat-burning process.
  • My dimply bottomed toddler was rapidly turning into a proper person and I worried that if I didn't make the jump now I would miss out on her childhood.
  • Puckered, dimply skin on the thighs, hips and buttocks, otherwise known as the dreaded cellulite, remains a mystery on many levels.

Definition of dimple in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day flippant
Pronunciation: ˈflipənt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude