There are 2 definitions of dink in English:

dink1

Line breaks: dink
Pronunciation: /dɪŋk
 
/

noun

another term for dinky2.

Definition of dink in:

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzit
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something

There are 2 definitions of dink in English:

dink2

Line breaks: dink
Pronunciation: /dɪŋk
 
/

noun

(In sport) a softly struck hit or kick of the ball that drops abruptly to the ground: a brilliantly controlled backhand dink over the net
More example sentences
  • Through the second and third sets, the Olympic gold medallist tormented the Czech with chips and dinks.
  • I never like it when I see Djokovic playing his little dinks and sliced drop shots.
  • The big-hitting Ukrainian reacts to the lightest of dinks from the Frenchman with a full-blooded backhand smash.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Hit or kick (the ball) softly so that it drops abruptly to the ground: he dinked a shot over the net to take the second set 7-5
More example sentences
  • Some of her flat-racket ground-strokes were irresistible and she was not afraid to chip, dink or gamble in tight situations.
  • The Scot doesn't do enough with his response, allowing Djokovic to dink the ball over to win the point.
  • Almost lying on the court, the Serb manages to send the ball back Murray's way before dinking it over the net to go 30-15 up in the seventh game.

Origin

1930s (originally a North American usage): symbolic of the light action.

Definition of dink in:

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzit
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something