Definition of distress in English:

distress

Line breaks: dis|tress
Pronunciation: /dɪˈstrɛs
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
  • 2 Law another term for distraint.
    More example sentences
    • On 22nd July 2003 the father employed bailiffs to levy distress on Ash Waste in respect of £2,857 allegedly owed as rent.
    • W. Toronto changed locks and posted bailiff notice of distress.
    • Payments were not made under the LO and bailiffs were instructed to levy distress but were unsuccessful.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • 2Give (furniture or clothing) simulated marks of age and wear: the manner in which leather jackets are industrially distressed
    More example sentences
    • So, I hereby grant you permission to paint that table, to distress it, to weather it, to paint it pink and stencil flowers around the edge if that pleases you.
    • The surface of the table has become distressed by time. There would be no space beneath such a thing to languish.
    • I use anything that is available to create a texture, make a mark, reflect light, distress the surface, etc.
    Synonyms
    age, season, condition, mellow, weather, simulate age in; damage, spoil, dent, scratch, chip, batter

Derivatives

distressful

adjective
More example sentences
  • In this stage, the patient uses the distressful affect to change the relevant contingencies.
  • Why should we make someone lead a painful and distressful life?
  • No one's life is free of distressful experiences and trauma.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French destresce (noun), destrecier (verb), based on Latin distringere 'stretch apart'.

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