Definition of divaricate in English:

divaricate

Line breaks: di|vari|cate
Pronunciation: /dʌɪˈvarɪkeɪt
 
, dɪ-/

verb

[no object] technical or literary
Stretch or spread apart; diverge widely: her crow’s feet are divaricating like deltas
More example sentences
  • Opportunities and pursuing things that are different from the norm - not divaricating in other directions - are fundamental to Martens's approach.
  • The Jurassic Mytilus furcatus Münster has finely nodose, moderately divaricating costae over the whole shell.
  • The fuzzy outlines of divaricating plants like coprosma virescens and low grasses should always be placed with bolder foliage for an exciting contrast.

adjective

Botany Back to top  
(Of a branch) coming off the stem almost at a right angle.

Origin

early 17th century: from Latin divaricat- 'stretched apart', from the verb divaricare, from di- (expressing intensive force) + varicare 'stretch the legs apart' (from varicus 'straddling').

Derivatives

divarication

Pronunciation: /-ˈkeɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • There is, however, a larger plot to the poem, wherein all of its disparate elements and wild divarications find their home.
  • Another interesting feature was divarication of midline abdominal musculature, which required correction.
  • It seamed that between extratonal and neo-tonal codes there were nothing but divarications.

Definition of divaricate in:

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retention of juvenile features in the adult animal