Definition of dizzy in English:

dizzy

Line breaks: dizzy
Pronunciation: /ˈdɪzi
 
/

adjective (dizzier, dizziest)

verb (dizzies, dizzying, dizzied)

[with object] (usually as adjective dizzying) Back to top  
  • Make (someone) feel unsteady, confused, or amazed: the dizzying rate of change her nearness dizzied him
    More example sentences
    • Dropping the chair with a clatter, Joel made for the door, his vision dizzying him.
    • Finally the pain became so bad it dizzied him and he fell to the sand and passed out.
    • As I walked in the door, the smell of fresh coffee beans and sweet buns dizzied me.

Phrases

the dizzy heights

informal A position of great importance: the dizzy heights of TV stardom
More example sentences
  • As he look down upon their rivals from the dizzy heights of pole position, complacency is the only real gremlin to fear.
  • By Thursday, it had become ‘uncommonly aristocratic’, and last Friday it had reached the dizzy heights of being ‘quintessentially iconoclastic’.
  • He never reached the dizzy heights of role model, and he seems unlikely to scale them now.

Derivatives

dizzily

adverb
More example sentences
  • But just as these dizzily warped abstractions threatened to become a redundant signature style, Davie discovered a way to move on.
  • The entire experience since they had entered the palace felt surreal, and she wondered dizzily and somewhat vaguely if she was going to faint again.
  • I dizzily pull off my boxer shorts, lose balance and crash into the shower door, which graciously opens and grants me entry into the shower.

dizziness

noun
More example sentences
  • It was a light headed feeling, almost dizziness, almost giddiness, and Darryl smiled back elatedly.
  • The paramedic had expected to find a 60-year-old woman suffering from dizziness.
  • She woke up in the morning and complained of severe headache and dizziness.

Origin

Old English dysig 'foolish', of West Germanic origin; related to Low German dusig, dösig 'giddy' and Old High German tusic 'foolish, weak'.

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