Definition of dour in English:

dour

Line breaks: dour
Pronunciation: /ˈdʊə
 
, ˈdaʊə
 
/

adjective

Relentlessly severe, stern, or gloomy in manner or appearance: a hard, dour, humourless fanatic
More example sentences
  • He looked like a dour, stern man and had a rather ominous air about him.
  • In his dour manner, he stated that he was the foreman of the team, and called over two other men whom he introduced.
  • Dire, dour and disappointing are three which spring instantly to mind.
Synonyms
stern, unsmiling, unfriendly, frowning, poker-faced, severe, forbidding, morose, sour, gruff, surly, uncommunicative, grim, gloomy, dismal, sullen, sombre, grave, sober, serious, solemn, austere, stony, unsympathetic, disapproving

Origin

late Middle English (originally Scots): probably from Scottish Gaelic dúr 'dull, obstinate, stupid', perhaps from Latin durus 'hard'.

Derivatives

dourly

adverb
More example sentences
  • Newton himself expressed his thoughts so dourly that students often avoided his lectures at Cambridge, and he spent his time, as one reporter put it, ‘lecturing to the walls’.
  • Clonmel's Minella stayed on dourly through the rain-softened ground to take the Shearwater Handicap ‘Chase.
  • His tinkling take on Karma Police, for instance, calls to mind Mozart's piano concertos, while Everything in Its Right Place, with its bottom-end minor notes, is dourly reminiscent of Shostakovich - and all free of Yorke's watery squall.

dourness

noun
More example sentences
  • Combining dourness and humour, sentimentality and hard-headedness, arrogance and tolerance, every situation is redeemed by laughter.
  • Brady's carefully-cultivated air of dismissive dourness offset Giles' sombre demeanour perfectly, as it usually does.
  • Deconstructive dourness never stays put, however, so of course the deconstructive acid seeped over from museum practices to high art itself.

Definition of dour in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day deictic
Pronunciation: ˈdīktik
adjective
denoting a word whose meaning depends on context...