Definition of edict in English:

edict

Line breaks: edict
Pronunciation: /ˈiːdɪkt
 
/

noun

An official order or proclamation issued by a person in authority: Clovis issued an edict protecting Church property
More example sentences
  • Another step forward was the progressive declarations of invalidity extended to certain laws, decrees, and edicts issued in Stalin's time.
  • Word of this soon reached the British top brass, who sent down an official edict ordering that the practice cease immediately.
  • Although government clerics often issue edicts against terror, the bulk of the government's effort has been security-related.
Synonyms
in Tsarist Russiaukase;
in Spanish-speaking countriespronunciamento

Origin

Middle English: from Latin edictum 'something proclaimed', neuter past participle of edicere, from e- (variant of ex-) 'out' + dicere 'say, tell'.

Derivatives

edictal

Pronunciation: /ɪˈdɪkt(ə)l/
adjective
More example sentences
  • He discusses the edictal words "or has not provided the means by which he might be sued."
  • The edicta are enumerated by Gaius among the sources of Roman law, and this part of the Roman law is sometimes called in the Pandect, Jus Honorarium, apparently because the edictal power belonged to those magistrates only who had the honores, and not so much ad honorem praetorum.

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Word of the day demoralize
Pronunciation: dəˈmôrəˌlīz
verb
cause (someone) to lose confidence or hope; dispirit