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elision

Line breaks: eli|sion
Pronunciation: /ɪˈlɪʒ(ə)n
 
/

Definition of elision in English:

noun

[mass noun]
1The omission of a sound or syllable when speaking (as in I’m, let’s): the shortening of words by elision [count noun]: conversational elisions
More example sentences
  • Still others prefer a middle option that keeps the apostrophe for omission and elision but drops it for plurality and possession.
  • Aside from occasionally adopting hubby Elvis Costello's cute little habit of syllabic elision, The Girl is character-free.
  • Similar to the Raskind and Higgins study, the present research also found significant increases in phonological awareness (i.e., phonological elision and nonword reading).
1.1 [count noun] An omission of a passage in a book, speech, or film: the movie’s elisions and distortions have been carefully thought out
More example sentences
  • But the eighty-four-minute film's more crucial faults are really its elisions and omissions, among them its failure to flesh out its distinctive characters.
  • Such forms lead to distortions, exclusions, elisions and the establishment of hegemonies.
  • This is such an obvious elision that one's instinct is to read the passage again and look for a misprint, or a set of scare quotes - but, no, it is written as intended.
2The process of joining together or merging things, especially abstract ideas: unease at the elision of so many vital questions
More example sentences
  • Across Europe, among the sceptics and the doubters and the out-and-out protesters, a pernicious process of elision is taking place.
  • However, this involves compaction and an elision; the self processes memory selectively.
  • The elision of two relatively stable and legitimate discourses of the idea of ‘capital’ and ‘emotional intelligence’ is a clever rhetorical move.

Origin

late 16th century: from late Latin elisio(n-), from Latin elidere 'crush out' (see elide).

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