Share this entry

Share this page

enrage

Line breaks: en¦rage
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈreɪdʒ
 
, ɛn-/

Definition of enrage in English:

verb

[with object]
Make (someone) very angry: the students were enraged at these new rules
More example sentences
  • On one occasion a very enraged customer was dragged screaming and shouting from the shop.
  • He was trying to tell us that this was for our own safety and that he had orders but I think he was also wary of enraging the crowd.
  • This will be a mammoth task as it risks enraging people already sceptical about the treaty.
Synonyms
British informal wind up, get on someone's wick, nark
North American informal burn up, tee off, tick off, gravel
vulgar slang piss off
British vulgar slang get on someone's tits
rare empurple
very angry, irate, furious, infuriated, angered, in a temper, incensed, raging, incandescent, fuming, ranting, raving, seething, frenzied, in a frenzy, beside oneself, outraged, in high dudgeon;
hostile, antagonistic, black, dark
British informal shirty, stroppy
North American informal sore, bent out of shape, soreheaded, teed off, ticked off
Australian/New Zealand informal ropeable, snaky, crook
West Indian informal vex
British informal , dated in a bate, waxy
vulgar slang pissed off
North American vulgar slang pissed
literary wrathful, ireful, wroth

Origin

late 15th century (formerly also as inrage): from French enrager, from en- 'into' + rage 'rage, anger'.

More
  • rage from (Middle English):

    In medieval times rage could also mean ‘madness’. It goes back ultimately to Latin rabere ‘to rave’, which is also the source of rabies, and early 17th-century rabid of which the early sense was ‘furious, madly violent’ (Dickens Dombey and Son: ‘He was made so rabid by the gout’). The sense ‘affected with rabies’ arose in the early 19th century. Since the late 18th century something that is the subject of a widespread temporary enthusiasm or fashion has been described as the rage or all the rage to mean ‘very popular or fashionable’. In 1811 the poet Lord Byron wrote that he was to hear his fellow poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ‘who is a kind of rage at present’. Bad drivers have always caused annoyance, but with increasing traffic and pace of life some people are now provoked into road rage. The phrase is first recorded in 1988, since when many other kinds of rage have been reported, among them air rage, trolley rage in a supermarket, and even golf rage. Enrage dates from the late 15th century.

Definition of enrage in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day cumbersome
Pronunciation: ˈkəmbərsəm
adjective
large or heavy and therefore difficult to carry…