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evidential

Line breaks: evi¦den|tial
Pronunciation: /ˌɛvɪˈdɛnʃ(ə)l
 
/

Definition of evidential in English:

adjective

formal
Of or providing evidence: the evidential bases for her argument
More example sentences
  • But the comparators that can be of evidential value, sometimes determinative of the case, are not so circumscribed.
  • It is said that the proven circumstances do not support an inference of confinement which is of evidential value in law.
  • With the case approached that way, he submits that it is not necessary to plead the evidential estoppel.

Origin

early 17th century: from medieval Latin evidentialis, from Latin evidentia (see evidence).

Derivatives

evidentiality

1
noun
Example sentences
  • But in some languages, including Tariana, you always have to put a little suffix onto your verb saying how you know something - we call it ‘evidentiality’.
  • In languages using a grammatical system known as evidentiality, for example, it's impossible to make a statement without also revealing why you believe that it's true.
  • This grammatical category, referring to information source, is called ‘evidentiality’.

evidentially

2
adverb
Example sentences
  • I am quite satisfied that this modest delay had had no effect on the cogency of the evidence and I do not consider the first defendants have been prejudiced evidentially in the smallest degree.
  • Nevertheless there is no scope evidentially for a prosecution.
  • So, both conceptually and evidentially, the last act within the defendant's control that gives the cause of complaint in relation evidentially closed.

Definition of evidential in:

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