Definition of exact in English:

exact

Line breaks: exact
Pronunciation: /ɪgˈzakt
 
, ɛg-/

adjective

verb

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  • 1Demand and obtain (something) from someone: he exacted promises that another Watergate would never be allowed to happen
    More example sentences
    • In a hierarchical conception of reality, the particular human being cannot defend his or her rights by demanding or exacting them independently of the whole.
    • Recovery was permitted only in cases in which money was exacted under an unlawful demand by a public authority where the payment was made under a mistake of fact of under compulsion of some kind.
    • The associated fighting exacted a terrible price of more than 3.5 million deaths, mainly from starvation and disease, according to aid agency estimates; the worst death toll since the Second World War.
    Synonyms
    demand, require, insist on, command, call for, impose, request, ask for, expect, look for; extract, compel, force, wring, wrest, squeeze, obtain
    archaic constrain
  • 1.1Inflict (revenge) on someone: she exacts a cruel revenge for his rejection
    More example sentences
    • Never take a slight personally, just sit back and wait until you can exact your cruel verbal revenge.
    • His mind conjured the most amazing, most subtle and cruel plan to exact his revenge.
    • Using as his model the ten plagues of the Pharaohs from the Old Testament, he exacts his cruel revenge on the nine medical people involved using rats, bats, locusts, and hail, among others.
    Synonyms
    inflict, impose, deliver, administer, issue, apply

Derivatives

exactable

adjective

exactitude

noun
More example sentences
  • Luxuriant tone, neat and precise passage work, rhythmic exactitude, strict dynamic control and near-perfect balance were features that were ever-present not only here but throughout the entire programme.
  • Her 58-year-old body has remained a remarkable instrument, capable of registering the minutest shifts and quivers of internal energy with extraordinary precision and exactitude.
  • We need to point out how disgraceful their actions are and how they stain the honor of a man who died for his country in combat without ranting, but with precision and exactitude.

exactor

noun
More example sentences
  • All it says is that you request my professional services as the exactor of your revenge - with the special introductory bonus of me giving you the ability to play that thing without being stoned by all in earshot.
  • A missionary friend was recommended to be ‘a preacher of piety, not an exactor of tithes’, to guide people into good living rather than taking taxes for the benefit of the Church.

Origin

late Middle English (as a verb): from Latin exact- 'completed, ascertained, enforced', from the verb exigere, from ex- 'thoroughly' + agere 'perform'. The adjective dates from the mid 16th century and reflects the Latin exactus 'precise'.

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