Definition of exotic in English:

exotic

Line breaks: exot¦ic
Pronunciation: /ɪgˈzɒtɪk
 
, ɛg-/

adjective

noun

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  • An exotic plant or animal: he planted exotics in the sheltered garden
    More example sentences
    • As in Hawaii, one of the most invasive and damaging exotics is the guava plant, which covers more than 12% of the farm area of the biggest island in the group.
    • And of course, all those wonderful exotics planted in Joubert Park are still there, thriving since they were planted over 100 years ago.
    • In the past exotics were mostly planted, mainly because they were easier to prune, and their root systems didn't interfere with the underground service pipes.

Derivatives

exotically

adverb
More example sentences
  • The various exotically named fruit and milk cocktails have found favour with the college going crowd.
  • Universally acclaimed as one of the most exotically beautiful buildings in the British Isles, the Royal Pavilion is the magnificent former seaside residence of King George IV.
  • We were now traversing a great garden of corals, of which the Barrier Reef has 350 different hard varieties and about 60 soft, many of them exotically coloured.

exoticism

Pronunciation: /-tɪsɪz(ə)m/
noun
More example sentences
  • When you get there you are enchanted by the exoticism of everything, by its immensity.
  • I was excited by the romantic exoticism of it, but it was also a little quaint and stagy.
  • I don't like their work just for its exoticism but because it is great art work, she said.

Origin

late 16th century: via Latin from Greek exōtikos 'foreign', from exō 'outside'.

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