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expire

Line breaks: ex¦pire
Pronunciation: /ɪkˈspʌɪə
 
, ɛk-/

Definition of expire in English:

verb

1 [no object] (Of a document, authorization, or agreement) come to the end of the period of validity: his driving licence expired
More example sentences
  • The current five-year lease agreement expires in 2002.
  • The nearly 10,000 flight attendants have been working without a new contract since their old agreement expired at the end of 1996.
  • The old collective agreement expired in May and talks began shortly thereafter.
Synonyms
run out, become invalid, become void, be no longer valid, lapse, cease, become obsolete;
end, finish, stop, come to an end, conclude, terminate, be over, be at an end
1.1(Of a period of time) come to an end: the three-year period has expired
More example sentences
  • The National Conference president also predicted that he will not hand over reigns of power to Congress after his three year term expires in November 2005.
  • There have been no indications on whether the team want him to stay beyond the summer of 2006 when his three-year term expires.
  • You were allowed to leave eight months before your term expired.
2(Of a person) die: the lady had expired bearing her lord a son
More example sentences
  • If two doctors agree that the condition has reached the point of no return then it should be agreed to let the person expire with dignity.
  • The mortality rate within the ghettos rose and people expired on the street.
  • If someone starves, a hero will give up their own food and die before letting that person expire.
Synonyms
die, pass away/on, decease, perish, depart this life, be no more, breathe one's last, draw one's last breath, meet one's end, meet one's death, meet one's Maker, give up the ghost, go to the great beyond, cross the great divide, shuffle off this mortal coil, go the way of the/all flesh, go to one's last resting place
British informal snuff it, peg out, pop one's clogs
3 [with object] technical Exhale (air) from the lungs: (as adjective expired) the volume of expired air
More example sentences
  • The vocal cords vibrate when air is expired through the glottis, creating sound waves in the column of air within the pharynx, nose, and mouth.
  • An index of alcohol intoxication was measured with a fuel-cell analyzer in air expired after breath was held for 15 sec.
  • The drug is primarily metabolized by the lungs and expired as carbon dioxide.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French expirer, from Latin exspirare 'breathe out', from ex- 'out' + spirare 'breathe'.

More
  • spirit from (Middle English):

    Our word spirit is based on Latin spiritus ‘breath or spirit’, from spirare ‘to breathe’—the ancient Romans believed that the human soul had been ‘breathed’ into the body—the image is the same as ‘the breath of life’. The sense ‘strong distilled alcoholic drink’ comes from the use in alchemy of spirit to mean ‘a liquid essence extracted from some substance’. People sometimes say the spirit is willing but the flesh is weak when they have good intentions but yield to temptation and fail to live up to them. The source is the New Testament, where Jesus uses the phrase after finding his disciples asleep in the Garden of Gethsemane despite telling them that they should stay awake. Spirare forms the basis of numerous English words including aspire (mid 16th century) from adspirare ‘to breath upon, seek to reach’; conspire (Late Middle English) from conspirare ‘to breath together, agree’; expire (late 16th century) ‘to breath out’; inspire (Late Middle English) ‘breath into’ from the idea that a divine or outside power has inspired you; and perspire (mid 17th century) ‘to breath through’; and transpire (Late Middle English) ‘breath across. In English spirit was shortened to sprite (Middle English) which in turn developed sprightly (late 16th century).

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