There are 2 definitions of fan in English:

fan1

Line breaks: fan

noun

1An apparatus with rotating blades that creates a current of air for cooling or ventilation: a couple of ceiling fans, lazily turning the kitchen may need to be fitted with an extractor fan
More example sentences
  • Ceiling fans that keep you cool in summer also can save energy in winter.
  • But the Ceramic World factory has no windows for ventilation and only large fans fixed to the ceiling.
  • An extractor fan was provided for ventilating the equipment room.
Synonyms
1.1A small sail for keeping the head of a windmill towards the wind.
More example sentences
  • While the previous windmill designs are for larger structures that could service entire towns, the fan-type windmill is made specifically for individuals.
2A handheld device, typically folding and shaped like a segment of a circle when spread out, that is waved so as to cool the person holding it: the girls were giggling behind their fans
More example sentences
  • Well-prepared with umbrellas and caps, spectators waved fans or improvised from whatever was at hand to fight the heat.
  • I presume she thought the rarity of the day justified her unorthodox behaviour in an era when ladies were expected to remain giggling behind their fans.
  • How do you walk downstairs in heels, waving giant fans, singing a song, looking at these guys like you love it.
2.1A thing resembling an open fan: [as modifier]: fan vaulting
More example sentences
  • Then it stood tall, unfolding its wings to their full fan of circle and began to shimmer the wing feathers, so that they scattered sunlight like jewels.
  • Needles of light, frozen rays, shot out from her back, spreading out like a fan, with a thin light webbing in between each.
  • Its big black wings spread like fans across the blazing sky.
2.2A fan-shaped alluvial or talus deposit at the foot of a slope: there are great waste fans at the foot of the Andes in the desert
More example sentences
  • Each terrace represents a fan of younger pyroclastic deposits infilling valleys cut in older fans.
  • Alluvial fans and related phenomena are depositional landforms which form a continuum.
  • Up to 2000 m of alluvial fan and fan delta deposits of early Cretaceous age are preserved in the Coastal Cordillera.

verb (fans, fanning, fanned)

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1 [with object] Cool (someone or something) by waving an object to create a current of air: he fanned himself with his hat
More example sentences
  • Some people were walking up and down just to keep cool while mums were fanning their children.
  • For the next three or four months, while the youngsters mature, the foundress cleans the nest regularly and helps keep it cool by fanning her wings.
  • When the weather turns hot, workers fan their wings at the entrance to the hive, cooling it.
Synonyms
cool, air, aerate, blow, ventilate; freshen, refresh
1.1(Of breath or a breeze) blow gently on: his breath fanned her skin as he leant towards her
More example sentences
  • Ally walked out of the building and onto the always-bustling street, a light breeze fanning her shoulder-length, caramel-blond hair out behind her.
  • He was so close that she could feel his rapid exhalations of breath gently fanning her face.
  • The lake looked cold and still, although a slight breeze gently fanned its surface so that it seemed to have gills.
1.2 [with object and adverbial of direction] Brush or drive away with a waving movement: a veil of smoke which she fanned away with a jewelled hand
More example sentences
  • She fanned away the steam trekking to the small mirror.
  • It seemed that every time he fanned away some sand with either his fins or his hands he revealed something remarkable.
  • I looked up, fanning away the smoke with one hand until I could make out the form of my brother Jason.
1.3 [no object] Baseball & Ice Hockey Swing unsuccessfully at the ball or puck: he had fanned 37 times in 83 at-bats
More example sentences
  • Esposito fanned on a long shot by Jacques Lemaire, then Henri Richard scored twice to give the Habs the championship.
  • He fanned seven and walked three before handing the ball over to Lin Ying-jeh.
  • In this day of home runs and strikeouts, I would like to know how many players have hit 40 home runs in a season without fanning more than 50 times?
1.4 Baseball Strike out (a batter): Norris fanned nine batters with his screwball
More example sentences
  • The Steinbach ace faced only 15 batters in the contest, fanning 13 of them.
  • Pitcher Troy Pruess blew the Brothers batters from the box, conceding just three hits and fanning 12 batters at the plate.
  • The team hopes Service returns to his 1998 form, when he fanned 95 batters in 82 2/3 innings.
2 [with object] Increase the strength of (a fire) by blowing on it or stirring up the air near it: fanned by an easterly wind, the fire spread rapidly
More example sentences
  • Firefighters had been monitoring hotspots but there were worries that increasing wind might fan the flames.
  • We have already experienced large fires, fanned by Westerly winds, in the Tenterfield area.
  • So here in normally lovely Marin, we are blanketed with smoke thick with particulate matter, blown in courtesy of offshore winds that are fanning the flames of a fire out of control up in Yolo county.
Synonyms
stir up, whip up, encourage, incite, stoke up, fuel, kindle, ignite, inflame, stimulate, instigate, provoke, excite, arouse, awaken, waken, inspire, trigger, spark off, ferment, foment
literary enkindle
2.1Cause (a belief or emotion) to become stronger or more widespread: a fury fanned by press coverage
More example sentences
  • A person who has declared his intentions for repeating the pogrom, outside Gujarat should not be allowed to roam about fanning communal hatred and passion.
  • They select those news reports that are consistent with their preferred thinking, especially those that fan national emotions.
  • People's fears, often fanned by anti-bat hysteria in the media about the danger of contracting bat-carried diseases, have made bats political pawns.
Synonyms
intensify, increase, agitate, inflame, exacerbate; stimulate, stir up, work up, whip up, incite, fuel, animate; ignite, kindle, trigger, spark, instigate, arouse, excite, provoke, foment
3 [no object] (fan out) Disperse or radiate from a central point to cover a wide area: the arriving passengers began to fan out through the town in search of lodgings
More example sentences
  • In addition to the areas where the delegates are concentrated, we began to fan out to other areas.
  • The commandos fan out to various areas on the ship and, after tense moments, the radio crackles into life: Pandey has taken control of the ship and his men are conducting the search.
  • In targeted sampling, interviewers fan out into targeted areas to conduct interviews over the course of several days.
Synonyms
spread, open, branch, stretch; outspread, unfurl, unfold
3.1Spread out or cause to spread out into a semicircular shape: [no object]: a dress made of tiny pleats that fanned out as she walked [with object]: a wind fanned her hair out behind her
More example sentences
  • Her short brown hair fanned out as she cocked her head to the side.
  • She had short, wavy brown hair that fanned out at the ends, and lovely facial features accented by eyebrows that gave her an incredible air of confidence and superiority.
  • It fanned out and lay open on the floor, just an ordinary white cloth upon a stoneworked floor.

Origin

Old English fann (as a noun denoting a device for winnowing grain), fannian (verb), from Latin vannus 'winnowing fan'. Compare with vane.

Phrases

fan the flames (of something)

Cause an emotion such as anger or hatred to become stronger: instead of being a calming force you fanned the flames of hostility
More example sentences
  • At a national level, the centre-right coalition Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi has been accused of fanning the flames of anti-foreigner discrimination.
  • Indeed, her words seem to have fanned the flames.
  • Worryingly last week, researchers at Glasgow Caledonian University were in danger of fanning the flames.

Derivatives

fan-like

adjective
More example sentences
  • It came with a strange fan-like contraption which turns out to be a reflector for the flash bulb.
  • The remaining proximal tendon fibers were then spread out in a fan-like shape, sandwiched between two pieces of sandpaper and tightly fixed in a metal clamp.
  • Let cool between paper towels to absorb extra fat, then cut each slice into 6 fan-like pieces (like you would cut slices in a cake).

fanner

noun
More example sentences
  • They were bystanders, fanners of flames, perhaps, but empty-handed, palms held upwards for inspection.
  • Rush Limbaugh, a right-wing fanner of hatreds who presents a popular radio show, has helped to make liberals into extremists after his own heart.
  • Pneumatically operated Sheet Fanners separate stacked sheets for easy handling, destacking, and transfer.

Definition of fan in:

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Word of the day dinkum
Pronunciation: ˈdiNGkəm
adjective
(of an article or person) genuine

There are 2 definitions of fan in English:

fan2

Line breaks: fan

noun

A person who has a strong interest in or admiration for a particular person or thing: football fans I’m a fan of this author
More example sentences
  • It is anyone's guess how many spectators will take an interest and even become fans of the sport.
  • With increasing numbers of African players in the British leagues, the tournament will be of huge interest to sports fans.
  • More than in other sports, football fans recollect jerseys and numbers as opposed to faces.
Synonyms
enthusiast, devotee, admirer, lover, addict; supporter, follower, disciple, adherent, backer, zealot, champion, votary; expert, connoisseur, aficionado
informal buff, fiend, freak, bug, nut, maniac, groupie, junkie
North American informal jock
(fans) British Sport informal barmy army

Origin

late 19th century (originally US): abbreviation of fanatic.

Definition of fan in: