There are 4 definitions of fine in English:

fine1

Line breaks: fine
Pronunciation: /fʌɪn
 
/

adjective

  • 3 Cricket Directed or stationed behind the wicket and close to the line of flight of the ball when it is bowled.
    More example sentences
    • He moved me back and the ball went straight through fine gully, again exactly where I had been standing.

noun

(fines) Back to top  
  • Very small particles found in mining, milling, etc..
    More example sentences
    • It raises dust, separating fines from aggregate.
    • The clay minerals and copious fines reported suggest that blockfields were produced by chemical weathering in a Mediterranean-type climate.
    • Eighteen stalls were randomly bedded with sand or granite fines.

adverb

Back to top  
  • 1 informal In a satisfactory or pleasing manner; very well: ‘And how’s the job-hunting going?’ ‘Oh, fine.’ mother and baby are both doing fine
    More example sentences
    • He was well liked and fine mannered young man who later secured work in the Bacon Factory where he spent some years.
    • He had had trouble with TelePrompter in the past, he did just fine last night.
  • 2 Cricket Behind the wicket and close to the line of flight of the ball when it is bowled.

verb

Back to top  
  • 1 [with object] Clarify (beer or wine) by causing the precipitation of sediment during production.
    More example sentences
    • We fine the wine with egg extracts, so are we to put that on the label?
    • Fish extract is used to fine the wine - to take all the cloudy particles out of it.
    • To ensure clarity and stability, wine often needs to be fined (wine-speak for clarified) and filtered.
  • 1.1 [no object] (Of liquid) become clear.
    More example sentences
    • The heavy rains earlier in the week have added a much needed drop of extra water to our local rivers which should be fining down nicely by the weekend.
    • Wood-matured ports, often called simply wood ports, are aged either in wooden casks or, sometimes, cement tanks, and are ready to drink straight after fining, filtration, and bottling.
  • 2Make or become thinner: [no object]: she’d certainly fined down—her face was thinner
    More example sentences
    • In a set of photographs at the end of the book, we see the twins fined down to skin and bone shortly after their release from Kolyma in 1942.
    • He preserved a courtly oblivion towards the event, though it seems beyond reason that he could have not noticed his wife's girth had suddenly fined down.
    • His face was fined down and lost most of its boyishness but his skin was still a dusky gold.
  • 3 [no object] (fine up) Northern English & Australian /NZ informal (Of the weather) become bright and clear.
    More example sentences
    • About 10: 30 P.M.that night it suddenly hit us all simultaneously that the wind had calmed down and the weather had fined up.
    • It was an easy day, but frustrating in having to just wait around until the weather fined up.
    • The weather will fine up on Tuesday before a change on Thursday night bringing some thundery rain on Friday followed by showers on Saturday and Sunday.

Phrases

cut it (or things) fine

Allow a very small margin of something, especially time: boys who have cut it rather fine are scuttling into chapel
More example sentences
  • They're cutting things fine in Athens as the jackhammers around the main stadium mix with the sounds of rehearsals for the Opening Ceremony.
  • The airport bus wasn't due to leave for 20 minutes, and it was already 6: 10, which was going to be cutting it fine for a 7pm flight.
  • ‘You're cutting it fine,’ said a thin man with dry lips.

do someone fine

Suit or be enough for someone.
More example sentences
  • So it looks like my theory that an 800 seater would do us fine with plenty of room for people who showed up on the day might have been a little over-optimistic.
  • I still ‘sleep fast ‘- 5-6 hours, but it seems to do me fine.’
  • If we finish one place behind the European qualification places it would do me fine.

fine feathers make fine birds

proverb Beautiful or expensive clothes may make the wearer seem more impressive than is really the case.

a fine line

A subtle distinction between two concepts or situations: there’s a fine line between humour and inappropriateness the president has been treading a fine line on immigration
More example sentences
  • In Riyadh, the absolute monarchy of Saudi Arabia walks a fine line to maintain power.
  • Each of them knows he walks a fine line.
  • In the Social Security debate, Democrats are walking a fine line.

the finer points of

The more complex or detailed aspects of: he went on to discuss the finer points of his work
More example sentences
  • I was discussing the finer points of impeachment, and votes of no confidence.
  • Now their only problem might come from itinerant lawyers wanting to discuss the finer points of local corporate law.
  • I doubt that he knows the finer points of what's proper or not proper.

——'s finest

North American informal The police of a particular city: Moscow’s finest
More example sentences
  • I opened the door to one of our city's finest… the Vancouver Police Department.
  • The inimitable Fish makes several pungent observations on the transgressions of our city 's finest this past holiday.
  • Some of the city's finest were recognized Feb. 7 for their cool heads in the line of duty.

one's finer feelings

One’s feelings of honour, loyalty, or duty; one’s conscience or sense of morality.
More example sentences
  • It was a period when middle-class fathers often withdrew behind taciturnity and rituals of manliness, when mothers stifled their finer feelings and aspirations behind domestic routines.
  • More specifically addressing Freeman Dyson's essay, Freeman writes ‘If we are partly analog, the downloading of a human consciousness into a digital computer may involve a certain loss of our finer feelings and qualities.’
  • It addresses our finer feelings, and gives exercise to every mild and generous propensity ’.

one's finest hour

The time of one’s greatest success.
More example sentences
  • They are nostalgic for their finest hour.
  • Others (the late, great Luis Bunuel for example), however, seem to enjoy their finest hour.
  • And let us not forget their finest hour: the night of treachery 14 years ago that began this whole unhappy saga

fine words butter no parsnips

proverb Nothing is achieved by empty promises or flattery.

not to put too fine a point on it

To speak bluntly: not to put too fine a point on it, your Emily is a liar
[figuratively, with reference to the sharpening of a weapon, tool, etc.]
More example sentences
  • For short stories are wonderful in this respect: they are, as the name of the genre strongly suggests, short, unlike novels, which, in comparison with most typical short stories, are, not to put too fine a point on it, long.
  • We are dealing here with people who are, not to put too fine a point on it, nuts.
  • This is, not to put too fine a point on it, insane.

one fine day

At some unspecified or unknown time: one fine day he decided to take an apartment in Rome
More example sentences
  • And once we get down to improving our infrastructure, which includes good roads, uninterrupted power supply, a good international airport, which is going to happen one fine day, then we can say we are nearly there.
  • Normal service resumes… oh, I don't know… one fine day.
  • Then one fine day, a boy called Rocky almost proved me wrong.

Derivatives

finely

adverb
More example sentences
  • This is an exhausting, but finely and intelligently acted picture about the last months of a dying man.
  • The sets are simply enormous and finely detailed and are captured in all their glory.
  • Add two small green chillies, finely sliced, and cook for another couple of minutes.

fineness

noun
More example sentences
  • The fineness of the mesh makes them completely watertight.
  • He received the wool in huge bales and then graded it according to length and fineness, before despatching it to the cloth-maker or dealer.
  • Rock salt is what the salt mined from underground is called, whether it is literally mined in solid form (a practice now rare) or pumped up to the surface and then evaporated, to be crystallized to the desired degree of fineness.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French fin, based on Latin finire 'to finish' (see finish).

More definitions of fine

Definition of fine in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day milord
Pronunciation: məˈlôrd
noun
used to address an English nobleman

There are 4 definitions of fine in English:

fine2

Line breaks: fine
Pronunciation: /fʌɪn
 
/

noun

  • A sum of money exacted as a penalty by a court of law or other authority: a parking fine
    More example sentences
    • The question becomes, ‘Are they penalties or fines imposed by a court’?
    • The Supreme Court held these fines could, consistent with the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, be imposed only if preceded by a criminal trial.
    • The Court should have regard to any other fines or penalties suffered by the defendant for the misconduct in question.
    Synonyms
    financial penalty, punishment, forfeit, forfeiture, sanction, punitive action, penalty, fee, charge, penance; (fines) damages
    formal mulct
    British historical amercement

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • Punish (someone) for an illegal or illicit act by making them pay a sum of money: she was fined £1500 for driving offences
    More example sentences
    • The recent move to fine inconsiderate drivers from illegal parking is late in forthcoming.
    • The magistrate convicted the applicant and fined him $400 with costs.
    • In related news, the Taiwan High Court yesterday fined a man for illegally hiring a Chinese woman to work in his home.
    Synonyms
    penalize, punish by fining, impose a fine on, exact a penalty from, charge
    informal sting
    formal mulct
    British historical amerce

Derivatives

fineable

Pronunciation: /ˈfʌɪnəb(ə)l/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Substantial areas in Scotland are now covered by these Orders which make it a fineable offence to fish without a written permit and/or by a method not prescribed on the permit.
  • Not only is it a fineable offence, it's completely disrespectful.
  • They declined to divulge any other examples of fineable offences.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French fin 'end, payment', from Latin finis 'end' (in medieval Latin denoting a sum paid on settling a lawsuit). The original sense was 'conclusion' (surviving in the phrase in fine); also used in the medieval Latin sense, the word came to denote a penalty of any kind, later specifically a monetary penalty.

More definitions of fine

Definition of fine in:

There are 4 definitions of fine in English:

fine3

Line breaks: fine
Pronunciation: /fiːn
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
  • 1French brandy of high quality made from distilled wine rather than from pomace.
  • 1.1 short for fine champagne.

More definitions of fine

Definition of fine in:

There are 4 definitions of fine in English:

fine4

Line breaks: fine
Pronunciation: /ˈfiːneɪ
 
/

noun

  • (In musical directions) the place where a piece of music finishes (when this is not at the end of the score but at the end of an earlier section which is repeated at the end of the piece).

Origin

Italian, from Latin finis 'end'.

More definitions of fine

Definition of fine in: