There are 2 definitions of funk in English:

funk1

Line breaks: funk
Pronunciation: /fʌŋk
 
/
informal

noun

  • 1 (also blue funk) chiefly British A state of great fear or panic: are you in a blue funk about running out of things to say?
    More example sentences
    • Job seekers anxious about seeing the freshest Craigslist posts can subscribe to a feed instead of hitting reload for hours in a paranoid funk.
    • Sometimes it requires a crisis to sort out those fitted for leadership from their confreres inclined to dash around in a blind funk.
    • So when I was instructed to put my haggling skills to work and go in search of some bargains in York city centre I was in a blind funk.
    Synonyms
    panic, state of fear, fluster
    informal cold sweat, flap, state, tizzy, tizz, tiz-woz, dither, stew
    British informal blue funk
    North American informal twit
  • 1.1chiefly North American A state of depression: I sat absorbed in my own blue funk
    More example sentences
    • But if savers and builders are sufficiently scared and sufficiently depressed, even big tax cuts may not be enough to bring them out of their funk.
    • The messages helped snap Pottruck out of his funk.
    • August historically is his best month, and he showed signs of snapping out of his funk before the break, hitting with authority and showing patience.
    Synonyms
    depression
    informal the dumps, the doldrums, low
    North American informal blue funk
  • 2 dated, chiefly British A coward: I sit shuddering, too much of a funk to fight

verb

[with object] chiefly British Back to top  
  • Avoid (something) out of fear: I could have seen him this morning but I funked it
    More example sentences
    • By a donnish performance, more in the style of a school of philosophy than of an economics department, Letwin proved the case for tax cuts, then forged an intellectual alibi for funking its implementation.
    • The attempt then to portray Al Gore, who rejected the subterfuge, as the one who was funking national debates was farcical.
    • It was interesting to see how Hollywood coped with this theme, and how director Sydney Pollack tiptoed towards reality but funked it in the end.
    Synonyms
    avoid, evade, dodge, escape from, run away from, baulk at, flinch from
    informal chicken out of, duck, wriggle out of, cop out of, get out of

Origin

mid 18th century (first recorded as Oxford University slang): perhaps from funk2 in the slang sense 'tobacco smoke', or from obsolete Flemish fonck 'disturbance, agitation'.

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There are 2 definitions of funk in English:

funk2

Line breaks: funk
Pronunciation: /fʌŋk
 
/

noun

  • 1 [mass noun] A style of popular dance music of US black origin, based on elements of blues and soul and having a strong rhythm that typically accentuates the first beat in the bar: a mixture of punk and funk [as modifier]: a funk bass line
    More example sentences
    • It combines elements of hip-hop, reggae, funk, punk rock and even traditional Irish folk music.
    • The result is an effort that encompasses a multitude of styles, from funk and soul to stirring ballads constructed around strong melodies.
    • The North Queensland based group are a newly-formed but very professional outfit who fuse elements of funk and reggae with hip hop and groovy rhythms.
  • 2 [in singular] North American informal, • dated A strong musty smell of sweat or tobacco: our sweat mingles, but the funk makes my stomach dizzy [mass noun]: he prowled his office trailing the telltale odour of funk
    More example sentences
    • It's not sweat or the funk from the equipment; it's a strange smell that's hard to describe.
    • We all smelled an odiferous funk coming from Viktor.
    • You gotta stick with me on this, though - I promise, the end result is worth the funk, and the smell goes away once it's been prepared.

verb

[with object] (funk something up) Back to top  
  • Give music elements of funk: we’re bringing back the old Motown sound and funking it up (as adjective funked-up) funked-up songs
    More example sentences
    • At heart we are a funk rock band. we do our own versions of some classic songs basically funking them up and messing with them, as well as our own originals.
    • Pine Grove Blues - A tune by Nathan Abshire which we took and funked it up a bit.
    • Still, there is not enough variety in the style of the songs - funk it up a bit.

Origin

early 17th century (in the sense 'musty smell'): perhaps from French dialect funkier 'blow smoke on', based on Latin fumus 'smoke'.

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