Definition of germinate in English:

germinate

Line breaks: ger¦min|ate
Pronunciation: /ˈdʒəːmɪneɪt
 
/

verb

[no object]
1(Of a seed or spore) begin to grow and put out shoots after a period of dormancy.
More example sentences
  • Breakdown takes place after a period of rest when seeds germinate and seedlings start growing.
  • Dashed segments of the line indicate where viable seeds do not germinate at low temperatures.
  • When contaminated seeds are planted, bunt spores germinate in the presence of moisture and infect the wheat seedlings.
Synonyms
sprout, put forth shoots, shoot, shoot up, bud, put forth buds, form/develop buds; develop, grow, spring up, swell
rare burgeon, vegetate, pullulate
1.1 [with object] Cause (a seed or spore) to germinate.
More example sentences
  • Mrs Perry said pumpkins did not take much work and her daughter had her own greenhouse and had germinated the seeds herself.
  • Although windowsills are good places to germinate seeds, they do have some drawbacks.
  • One of the ideas was to use empty yoghurt pots to germinate seeds.
1.2Come into existence and develop: the idea germinated and slowly grew into an obsession
More example sentences
  • These are tools for helping communities to germinate, develop and extend themselves.
  • The idea for Gubu Nation - a collection of more than 50 uniquely Irish tales during the country's development - germinated during this time.
  • Through a combination of her determination and solid common sense, the club was fully operational within a few months of the idea germinating.
Synonyms
develop, take root, grow, spring up, arise, emerge, evolve, mature, expand, enlarge, spread, advance, progress

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin germinat- 'sprouted forth, budded', from the verb germinare, from germen, germin- 'sprout, seed'.

Derivatives

germination

Pronunciation: /-ˈneɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • The processes of pollen grain development and germination depend on the uptake and metabolism of pollen sugars.
  • In the field, germination occurs in spring when both temperature and soil salinity are still relatively low.
  • Further research is therefore needed into the control of maturation and germination of somatic embryos.

germinative

Pronunciation: /-nətɪv/
adjective
More example sentences
  • When highly viable (96% germinative capacity) fresh seeds were incubated in water at a range of constant temperatures, none germinated at 10°C.
  • Dormancy is the inability of the viable seed to commence germinative growth even when environmental conditions are physiologically favourable.
  • This terminal phase of seed development, called maturation drying, is also known to ensure the switch from a developmental mode to a germinative mode.

germinator

noun
More example sentences
  • This independence has allowed universities across the generations to be the germinators of creativity, reform and innovation.
  • These seeds were not induced into secondary dormancy and are classed as germinators.
  • The studios cultivated their Gables and Garbos not primarily as acting talents (though some, of course, could act) but as cynosures, publicity garnerers, dream germinators.

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Pronunciation: ˈ(h)yo͞obris
noun
excessive pride or self-confidence