There are 4 definitions of gig in English:

gig1

Line breaks: gig
Pronunciation: /gɪg
 
/

noun

1chiefly historical A light two-wheeled carriage pulled by one horse.
More example sentences
  • During the war we had a gig with a cart horse and used to bowl along around the north-west end of town - great transport when petrol was rationed.
  • Luckily for him, her carriage was an open gig, and she had no trouble hearing him above the crickets and the wind.
  • On one occasion the Archdeacon conducted a service on the verandah and the neighbours arrived for this in gigs, on horseback and in cars.
2A light, fast, narrow boat adapted for rowing or sailing.
More example sentences
  • The new gig should be out of the builders by April next year, giving plenty of time to think of a name.
  • An hour or two later, the ferry tows the gigs home.

Origin

late 18th century: apparently a transferred sense of obsolete gig 'a flighty girl', which was also applied to various objects or devices that whirled.

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Word of the day setose
Pronunciation: ˈsēˌtōs
adjective
bearing bristles or setae; bristly

There are 4 definitions of gig in English:

gig2

Line breaks: gig
Pronunciation: /gɪg
 
/
informal

noun

1A live performance by a musician or group playing popular or jazz music.
More example sentences
  • Imagine being a successful Jazz musician playing gigs on the road, performing in the Big Apple's coolest clubs and even under the stage lights of Broadway.
  • I also did quite a lot of gigs with different set-ups and I always had to re-arrange the music again for these gigs, which takes a lot of time.
  • This not-to-be-missed gig on November 6 at 8.30 pm is a welcome highlight for all fans of traditional music and live gigs.
1.1A task or assignment: working on the sea and spotting whales seemed like a great gig
More example sentences
  • That might be an even tougher assignment than his international gig.
  • After I get writing gigs, I try to take care of them as soon as I can.
  • In any event, it couldn't have helped me, and I continue to pay the rent with menial office work and a few freelance writing gigs.

verb (gigs, gigging, gigged)

[no object] Back to top  
1Perform a gig or gigs: two or three nights a week we were gigging
More example sentences
  • That, my friends, could be the album's only fatal flaw - they've been gigging solidly with these songs, and when the album's released they'll be gigging with them again.
  • Evidently, from the tight togetherness of the playing here, these were accomplished show bands used to endlessly gigging.
  • We plan to gig as much as we can and hopefully get an album released, we have enough material.
1.1 [with object] Use (a piece of musical equipment) at a gig: 12-string guitar, mint condition, never gigged

Origin

1920s: of unknown origin.

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There are 4 definitions of gig in English:

gig3

Line breaks: gig
Pronunciation: /gɪg
 
/

noun

A harpoon-like weapon used for catching fish.

verb (gigs, gigging, gigged)

[no object] Back to top  
Fish using a gig.

Origin

early 18th century: shortening of earlier (rarely used) fizgig, probably from Spanish fisga 'harpoon'.

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There are 4 definitions of gig in English:

gig4

Line breaks: gig
Pronunciation: /gɪg
 
, dʒɪg/

noun

Computing, informal
short for gigabyte. over 9 gigs of programs for the PC
More example sentences
  • The good news is, you get an extra gig of data download to watch this.
  • In an entire month, this web site might use up 60 gigs in bandwidth - although unlikely.
  • The user was cut off after downloading 150 gigs this month.

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