Definition of glum in English:

glum

Line breaks: glum
Pronunciation: /ɡlʌm
 
/

adjective (glummer, glummest)

Looking or feeling dejected; morose: the princess looked glum but later cheered up
More example sentences
  • What's the point in going out for a coffee if you're going to sit there all glum and miserable?
  • He made a concerted effort to smile his way out of his understandably glum expression while I tried to say what I wanted to say in the right kind of way.
  • After a minute he hung up the phone with a glum expression on his face and went back to driving meticulously.
Synonyms
British informal brassed off, cheesed off, looking as if one had lost a pound and found a penny
literary dolorous
archaic chap-fallen, adust

Origin

mid 16th century: related to dialect glum 'to frown', variant of gloom.

Derivatives

glumly

adverb
More example sentences
  • Becky, the eldest, was staring glumly at her latest present.
  • He plays with his Caesar salad, glumly spearing croutons or else sweeping one of those supremely talented hands through his heavy flick of a fringe.
  • ‘Now all we have to do is find out way back out to the motorway again,’ Graham said, just a little glumly.

glumness

noun
More example sentences
  • The findings of this study show a worrying trend towards glumness.
  • There's relief in his voice, but glumness too, a result of his sudden homelessness and the loss of many of his belongings - clothes, furniture, even musical instruments.
  • There are plenty of hackneyed truisms about ill-winds, silver-linings and darkness-before-dawns that can be tossed into the glumness.

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