Definition of grog in English:

grog

Line breaks: grog
Pronunciation: /ɡrɒɡ
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
1Spirits (originally rum) mixed with water.
More example sentences
  • The rest of the rum was poured into a large tub and mixed with water - three parts water to one of rum (after 1938, only two parts water) - to become grog, which was what the ratings got.
  • Well, the late-night grog and rum parties really helped!
  • A shot of local rum or creamy rum grog is a traditional accompaniment.
1.1 informal or Australian/NZ Alcoholic drink.
More example sentences
  • Rain or fine it is a great day, for drinking grog, meeting up with old mates and meeting a few new ones.
  • He knew it would be torture to have to drink a mug of grog at each and every one, but he would do it if it meant finding the correct tavern.
  • They're in town drinking and getting sick from grog.
2Crushed unglazed pottery or brick used as an additive in plaster or clay.
More example sentences
  • Clay with more grog retains its shape longer; clay with less grog has less resistance when pulled.
  • It was referred to as ‘lithpodipyra’, the Greek for ‘twice-fired stone’, on account of the mixture of grog and pre-fired clay ground up with flint to form a paste.
  • While the clay is wet, I may add grog or dry clay to the surface.

Origin

mid 18th century: said to be from Old Grog, the reputed nickname (because of his grogram cloak) of Admiral Vernon (1684–1757), who in 1740 first ordered diluted (instead of neat) rum to be served out to sailors.

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