There are 4 definitions of hawk in English:

hawk1

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Pronunciation: /hɔːk
 
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noun

1A diurnal bird of prey with broad rounded wings and a long tail, typically taking prey by surprise with a short chase. Compare with falcon.
  • Family Accipitridae: several genera, especially Accipiter, which includes the sparrowhawk and goshawk
More example sentences
  • Bird watchers will be treated to the sight of caracara hawks, Florida sandhill cranes, and numerous other species.
  • If you're lucky, you can sight one of the smaller numbers of red-shoulder hawks, red-tail hawks and the elusive, endangered Peregrine Falcon.
  • Red-tailed hawks and turkey vultures circled above us in a blue sky.
1.1North American A bird of prey related to the buzzards.
More example sentences
  • He explained to the judge he couldn't help himself out there under the blue sky, under the billowing clouds, way way up, the gliding buzzard hawks circling, circling, free as the breeze.
1.2 Falconry Any diurnal bird of prey used in falconry.
More example sentences
  • The regular flying demonstrations give visitors the opportunity to see some of the 75 eagles, falcons, hawks, vultures and owls at close range.
  • Employees from Ashford Castle's school of falconry bring hawks and falcons to Rathroeen where they keep vermin and other birds at bay.
  • He enjoyed the atmosphere and, despite the distance, is interested in bringing his owls, hawks and falcons back down next year.
2A person who advocates an aggressive or warlike policy, especially in foreign affairs: severe limits were put on the peace plan by party hawks Compare with dove1 ( sense 2).
More example sentences
  • Americans may indeed be well served externally at this dangerous juncture by the unsentimental foreign policy hawks that tend to predominate in the Republican Party.
  • The administration hawks don't want disarmament, they want conquest; and whether or not they get to pursue it in this case, their overall objectives will not change.
  • Mirroring the shallowness of hawks, who condemn peaceniks for their lack of patriotism, many doves castigate anyone who is not opposed to war.
3Used in names of hawkmoths, e.g. eyed hawk.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
1(Of a person) hunt game with a trained hawk: he spent the afternoon hawking
More example sentences
  • She had a weakness for fine clothes and being a vigorous lady, she enjoyed hawking, shooting the long bow, and making the trip from Theobalds to Westminster, a dozen miles away on horseback.
  • They were also one of the most popular game birds for hawking and Henry VIII passed legislation imposing heavy fines on those caught stealing heron eggs or killing them by any means other than hawking.
  • Successful hawking becomes routine, and soon one hunt per day is not enough.
2(Of a bird or dragonfly) hunt on the wing for food: swifts hawked low over the water
More example sentences
  • I did see a few egrets in the fields (maybe cattle egrets) and a group of blue-cheeked bee-eaters hawking for insects and perching on powerlines.
  • Swifts screaming overhead, hawking for insects in their no-compromise lifestyle.
  • Fishing bats are large, yellow-orange, and rather pungent creatures that can hawk large flying insects or snag small ocean fish from the surf.

Phrases

have eyes like a hawk

Miss nothing of what is going on around one.
More example sentences
  • He had eyes like a hawk and was usually very perceptive.
  • I tried to duck away without being seen, but Wright had eyes like a hawk and spotted me.
  • Mr. Martin has eyes like a hawk, and sees all.

watch someone like a hawk

Keep a vigilant eye on someone, especially to check that they do nothing wrong: she watched them like a hawk because some of them were bound to cheat
More example sentences
  • Fear of losing their child kept them watching Matt like a hawk, staring at his arms for a sign, watching over his medications and sleeping habits.
  • He settled back in his chair, but I noticed that he was watching me like a hawk.
  • Now the silent majority will be watching him like a hawk, putting everything he says under the microscope of what is and what isn't acceptable.

Derivatives

hawklike

adjective
More example sentences
  • My face is too hawklike, too sharp and opaque in emotion to really be appealing.
  • He is enormous, with a caveman's backward-sloping brow, a hawklike proboscis, and a lumbering walk.
  • He has red hair and brilliant green eyes, fringed with lashes night-black, so he seems almost hawklike.

Origin

Old English hafoc, heafoc, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch havik and German Habicht.

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Word of the day punctum
Pronunciation: ˈpəNGktəm
noun
a small, distinct point

There are 4 definitions of hawk in English:

hawk2

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Pronunciation: /hɔːk
 
/

verb

[with object]
Carry about and offer (goods) for sale, typically advertising them by shouting: street traders were hawking costume jewellery
More example sentences
  • People are renting rooms, running taxis, selling ice-cream out of their front windows and hawking cigars and peanuts in the streets.
  • I felt a little uncharitable: maybe they were just honest but hard-up Grimsby trawlermen, reduced to hawking their catch on the streets.
  • By coincidence, the restaurant was across the street from where Bradbury was hawking newspapers.

Origin

late 15th century: probably a back-formation from hawker1.

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There are 4 definitions of hawk in English:

hawk3

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Pronunciation: /hɔːk
 
/

verb

[no object]
1Clear the throat noisily: he hawked and spat into the flames
More example sentences
  • Their subtle lack of receptiveness is finally made flagrantly obvious when one noisily hawks an enormous loogie and spits it onto the stove, where it sizzles like an oyster at a beachside barbecue.
  • You hear everything: coughing, hawking up a loogey, vomiting.
  • Plus, who doesn't like hawking up big gobs of phlegm?
1.1 [with object] (hawk something up) Bring phlegm up from the throat.
More example sentences
  • The whole thing sticks in my throat like a fish bone, and I've got to hawk it up or choke to death on it.
  • Well most people can hawk it up and spit it out of their mouth… but I cannot do that.
  • I was prepared to neatly hawk it up, wipe my mouth, and toss my little bag in the nearest trash can.

Origin

late 16th century: probably imitative.

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There are 4 definitions of hawk in English:

hawk4

Line breaks: hawk
Pronunciation: /hɔːk
 
/

noun

A plasterer’s square board with a handle underneath for carrying plaster or mortar.
More example sentences
  • Load some stucco on a hawk and then onto your trowel.
  • For large jobs, a hawk is better than a mud pan.
  • Moisten your plywood hawk and load it up with mortar. Hold the hawk against the wall and use a long, thin trowel to pack mortar into joints.

Origin

late Middle English: of unknown origin.

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