Definition of hawkish in English:

hawkish

Line breaks: hawk|ish
Pronunciation: /ˈhɔːkɪʃ
 
/

adjective

1Resembling a hawk in nature or appearance: his hawkish nose
More example sentences
  • They have hawkish noses, receding chins and luxuriant mullets that fall to their jeans.
  • A hawkish nose stretched out from his face and golden-silver hair fell around his shoulders.
  • Tall and slim, his neatly-parted silver hair and rimless spectacles sit atop a hawkish nose and ice-blue eyes that are almost a caricature of the Prussian officer.
2Advocating an aggressive or warlike policy, especially in foreign affairs: the administration’s hawkish stance
More example sentences
  • If anything, the Democrats have the more hawkish record on foreign policy.
  • The South is more hawkish on foreign policy, according to the data, while the East and West Coast states are the most dovish.
  • When that man was in charge of monetary policy, he was known as the most hawkish Reserve Bank governor in the entire developed world.

Derivatives

hawkishly

adverb
More example sentences
  • The 62-year-old Pacino looks very different from the hawkishly greying Don imagined at the end of The Godfather Part II.
  • He is needle-sharp, ebullient and hawkishly bright.
  • Here journalists could be hawkishly monitored.

hawkishness

noun
More example sentences
  • Her school is conservative, but hardly unique in its hawkishness.
  • All of that newfound hawkishness in Boston surely sounded odd to many of the decidedly anti-war delegates.
  • I was at the peak of my hawkishness about the cold war, and that was the perspective from which I was teaching.

Definition of hawkish in:

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