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heriot

Line breaks: her¦iot
Pronunciation: /ˈhɛrɪət
 
/

Definition of heriot in English:

noun

historical
A tribute paid to a lord out of the belongings of a tenant who died, often consisting of a live animal or, originally, military equipment that he borrowed.
Example sentences
  • On top of this, the dutiful John Ronewyk carefully recorded a list of the ‘fines terrae’ owed by those replacing dead tenants, and the heriots (the best beast in the herd) of those heirs who took over from their dead fathers.
  • The serf also paid a variety of dues to the lord: the annual capitation or head tax (literally, a tax on existence), the taille (a tax on the serf's property), and the heriot (an inheritance tax).
  • And the heriot of the man who falls before his lord during a campaign, whether within the country or abroad, shall be remitted, and the heirs shall succeed to his land and his property and make a very just division of the same.

Origin

Old English heregeatwa, from here 'army' + geatwa 'trappings'.

Definition of heriot in:

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Word of the day orthoepy
Pronunciation: ôrˈTHōəpē
noun
the correct or accepted pronunciation of words