Definition of hutch in English:

hutch

Line breaks: hutch
Pronunciation: /hʌtʃ
 
/

noun

1A box or cage, typically with a wire mesh front, for keeping rabbits or other small domesticated animals: a rabbit hutch
More example sentences
  • Remember, the hospice only has use for good, clean items, not dirty rabbit hutches and bird cages or other items which should go to the council tip.
  • They did not use compost, but they often placed their garden near the pigpen, chicken yard, or rabbit hutches so that these animals could convert less palatable garden produce into manure.
  • Along the way, the process of domestication began by keeping rabbits in hutches for breeding and meat production.
2North American A storage chest.
More example sentences
  • Colorfully painted computer desks with attached hutches and printer stands offer necessary work areas and storage for school essentials.
  • Inside was a tiny room which held a custom made bunk bed, bookshelf, a small desk and a wooden hutch which was filled with potions, dusty books, candles and three jet black photo albums.
  • These hutches are 30 inches by 36 inches and cost $20 to $35 each.
2.1A cupboard or dresser.
More example sentences
  • He was taken with the rows of pigeonholes and small drawers in the hutch along the back of it.
  • Inside, the house is decorated simply: a table with a flowery cloth and a vase of flowers, a hutch with little spice bottles and a futon for sitting or sleeping.
  • For rustic country decor in the kitchen, use open shelves, hutches, buffets, plate racks and cupboards for storage.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French huche, from medieval Latin hutica, of unknown origin. The original sense was 'storage chest', surviving in North American usage (sense 2).

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