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imagism

Line breaks: im¦agism
Pronunciation: /ˈɪmɪdʒɪz(ə)m
 
/

Definition of imagism in English:

noun

[mass noun]
A movement in early 20th-century English and American poetry which sought clarity of expression through the use of precise images. The movement derived in part from the aesthetic philosophy of T. E. Hulme and involved Ezra Pound, James Joyce, Amy Lowell, and others.
Example sentences
  • Symbolism and imagism, stream-of-consciousness and surrealism were all tried out, and three of the poems in Experiment 1 were simply titled ‘Poem’.
  • Modernist poetics, especially in its early formulation as imagism, also stresses the singularity of visual or tactile stimulus in conjunction with intuitive thought and spontaneous language.
  • Within a remarkably short span of time they cycled through a variety of literary schools and trends, ranging from neo-romanticism to imagism to surrealism.

Derivatives

imagist

1
noun
Example sentences
  • The North American imagists, although stimulated by French symbolism, tended to use the metaphor sparingly and relied on a poetry of understatement.
  • She also returns to meters the imagists eschewed.
  • But in the end, after its unmasking, Spectra didn't matter: the imagists had moved on anyway, and the hoax turned into a benign joke.

imagistic

2
Pronunciation: /-ˈdʒɪstɪk/
adjective
Example sentences
  • It subverts the rules of the rational world - the mainstream world - with its seemingly familiar form that is invaded by the irrational, the surreal, the magically real, the absurd, the imagistic, the truly symbolic.
  • There's an awful lot of content in New York poets - in a way they're very figurative and imagistic.
  • Without battling once more over the turf-claims for lyric or narrative, we can say lyric poetry is typically brief, its language is imagistic, its nature is deliberately symbolic, and its speaker is an individual.

Definition of imagism in:

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