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immoderate

Line breaks: im¦mod¦er|ate
Pronunciation: /ɪˈmɒd(ə)rət
 
/

Definition of immoderate in English:

adjective

Not sensible or restrained; excessive: immoderate drinking
More example sentences
  • The focus on public perception was timely and uncommonly sensible, leading to immoderate yahooing in certain loungerooms.
  • It also contains an alkaloid called arecoline, which can usually due to excessive or immoderate use over a long period of time produce squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth, a form of skin cancer.
  • Remember the cause of this is blocking the qi of the spleen and stomach as a result of excessively cold or hot food and drink and immoderate and irregular eating habits.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin immoderatus, from in- 'not' + moderatus 'reduced, controlled' (past participle of moderare).

Derivatives

immoderately

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • The cumulative gain on capital over that time, with quite a respectable long term growth rate, particularly accelerated over recent centuries, has made me altogether immoderately rich.
  • When she talked, she spoke in husky tones and larded her remarks with double-entendres, and when I talked, she hung on my words and laughed immoderately at the faintest suggestion of wit in my remarks.
  • It was a moderately brave act of which I remain immoderately proud, as a just and deeply felt tribute to a truly great player.

Words that rhyme with immoderate

moderate

Definition of immoderate in:

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