Definition of incriminate in English:

incriminate

Line breaks: in|crim¦in|ate
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈkrɪmɪneɪt
 
/

verb

[with object]
  • Make (someone) appear guilty of a crime or wrongdoing: he refused to answer questions in order not to incriminate himself (as adjective incriminating) incriminating evidence
    More example sentences
    • Benicia invited Martin to lunch to discuss evidence that could incriminate him in the embezzlement.
    • However, Germany has insisted it cannot bend its laws forbidding supplying evidence that could incriminate someone facing execution.
    • There was no need of any evidence that might incriminate him for treason.
    Synonyms
    implicate, involve; blame, accuse, denounce, inform against, blacken the name of; entrap
    informal frame, set up, point the finger at, stick/pin the blame on, grass on, rat on
    British informal fit up
    archaic inculpate

Derivatives

incrimination

Pronunciation: /-ˈneɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • He appeared on subpoena and declined to answer a number of questions directed to the documents on the ground of potential self incrimination.
  • However he used a special defence of incrimination to blame his two co-accused.
  • The Law Commission proposed that the privilege should be restricted to incrimination for crimes punishable by imprisonment.

incriminatory

adjective
More example sentences
  • Either counsel had agreed or the judge had ruled (correctly in our view) that these were incriminatory admissions which had not been made under caution and should not, therefore, go before the jury.
  • The defendant in domestic proceedings had argued that national law was incompatible with Community law because it was obliged to produce incriminatory evidence.
  • The open mind and willingness to change, when a different direction is identified, might be a better, and less incriminatory way forward for a county which cannot afford to lose any supportive voice or money.

Origin

mid 18th century (earlier (mid 17th century) as incrimination): from late Latin incriminat- 'accused', from the verb incriminare, from in- 'into, towards' + Latin crimen 'crime'.

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