Definition of inexorable in English:

inexorable

Line breaks: in|ex¦or|able
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈɛks(ə)rəb(ə)l
 
/

adjective

Derivatives

inexorability

Pronunciation: /-ˈbɪlɪti/
noun
More example sentences
  • As the current standard-bearers for mankind, we must also bear the heavy burden of being its worst incarnation yet, and that, with the inexorability of time, things can only get worse.
  • For Dickens, history has both an inexorability and an arbitrariness.
  • The suddenness of the storm, and its inexorability, amaze the crew; their aristocratic passengers show only irritation at the crew's alarm.

inexorably

adverb
More example sentences
  • Steel prices began to rise inexorably last year and continued to do so until recently.
  • For all architecture, whatever its style and purpose, is inexorably tied to humanity.
  • The pressure to provide care home places is rising inexorably at a time when the number of places is falling.

Origin

mid 16th century: from French, or from Latin inexorabilis, from in- 'not' + exorabilis (from exorare 'entreat').

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Word of the day skosh
Pronunciation: skōSH
noun
a small amount; a little