Definition of ingrain in English:

ingrain

Line breaks: in|grain
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈgreɪn
 
/

verb

(also engrain) [with object] Firmly fix or establish (a habit, belief, or attitude) in a person: they trivialize the struggle and further ingrain the long-standing attitudes
More example sentences
  • She's a race-walking instructor who bubbles with enthusiasm, armed with clever similes and a rigid attitude about ingraining proper technique.
  • I've been trying to do more, lately, but I have a hard time ingraining things as habit sometimes.
  • Posted calligraphy engrains the warrior code of Bushido and expounds the philosophical roots of kendo.
Synonyms
entrench, establish, fix, inculcate, instil, implant, root; drive home, hammer home, drill into, drive into, din into

adjective

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(Of a textile) composed of fibres which have been dyed different colours before being woven.
More example sentences
  • Aniline black for cotton was the first ingrain color, or dye developed directly on the fiber.
  • these historical Ingrain dyes for cotton developed in the 1950's are now rarely used for solid-shade dyeing.
  • The dots which are represented on the groundwork of the initial are worked in back stitching; these may be worked in scarlet ingrain cotton if desired.

Origin

late Middle English (originally as engrain in the sense 'dye with cochineal or in fast colours'): from en-1, in-2 (as an intensifier) + the verb grain. The adjective is from in grain 'fast-dyed', from the old use of grain meaning 'kermes, cochineal'.

Definition of ingrain in:

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