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interpose

Line breaks: inter|pose
Pronunciation: /ɪntəˈpəʊz
 
/

Definition of interpose in English:

verb

1 [with object] Place or insert between one thing and another: she interposed herself between the newcomers
More example sentences
  • And the specialist system itself, in which specialists firms are interposed between buyers and sellers, it is likely, it seems to me, to come under severe attack.
  • Thus, for example, a liver that is palpable may not be detected by percussion, if, as occasionally happens, a segment of colon is interposed between the liver and the abdominal wall.
  • After assembly of the coupling using the method of the present invention, a terminal end of the flexible hose is interposed between the terminal end of the rigid pipe and the clamping ring.
Synonyms
insinuate, place, put
1.1Say (words) as an interruption: if I might interpose a personal remark here
More example sentences
  • He interposed, ‘Even if it doesn't knock you down, do you still feel it?’
  • ‘He's a businessman, he has to be that way,’ Simon quietly interposed.
  • ‘You are not trying a more difficult spell,’ Smith interposed forcefully.
Synonyms
introduce, insert, interject, inject, add, throw in, put in, work in
2 [no object] Intervene between parties: [with infinitive]: the legislature interposed to suppress these amusements
More example sentences
  • Now again an angel might interpose, between Abraham and his maundering delusion that he must slaughter his second son, Isaac.
  • It was admitted, that in case the guardians should misbehave, the Court might interpose, upon a presumption, that the testator himself would not have entrusted the guardians with this power, had he foreseen they would have abused it.
  • Among the economic élite the fear spread that the USSR would interpose between the defeat of Germany and the Anglo-Saxon victory with consequences which would be felt both inside and outside Italy.
Synonyms
intervene, intercede, step in, mediate, involve oneself;
interfere, intrude, obtrude, butt in, cut in
informal barge in, horn in, muscle in
2.1 [with object] Exercise or advance (a veto or objection): the memo interposes no objection to issuing a discharge
More example sentences
  • In his later years he was fully informed of the choices being made, but interposed no public objection as his edifice of dreams was systematically reduced to rubble.
  • The Attorney General may deny Section 5 preclearance (by interposing an objection) no later than 60 days after a voting change has been submitted.
  • Needless to say, these same critics will then have new objections to interpose.

Origin

late 16th century: from French interposer, from Latin interponere 'put in' (from inter- 'between' + ponere 'put'), but influenced by interpositus 'inserted' and Old French poser 'to place'.

Definition of interpose in:

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