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kook

Line breaks: kook
Pronunciation: /kuːk
 
/

Definition of kook in English:

noun

North American informal
A mad or eccentric person.
Example sentences
  • Neither of them are kooks, they've simply been lied to by the people who are in charge.
  • I worry just as much, however, about the kooks out there who think that now is the time to plant a bomb.
  • The only people who cite the Columbia study are kooks and religious zealots.

Origin

1960s: probably from cuckoo.

More
  • cuckoo from (Middle English):

    The cuckoo is one of those birds whose name echoes the sound of its distinctive call—other examples are curlew (Late Middle English), hoopoe (mid 17th century), kittiwake (mid 17th century), and peewit [E16th]. You can describe an unwelcome intruder in a place or situation as a cuckoo in the nest. This comes from the cuckoo's habit of laying her eggs to be raised in another bird's nest. Cuckold (Old English), referring to the husband of an unfaithful wife, also derives from cucu, and plays on the same cuckoo-in-the-nest idea, although it is not actually the husband who is being the ‘cuckoo’. The reason that a silly or mad person is described as a cuckoo, or is said to have gone cuckoo, is probably that the bird's monotonously repeated call suggests simple-mindedness. Kook, ‘an eccentric person’, is short for cuckoo. It was first recorded in the 1920s but only really became common in the late 1950s. See also cloud, coccyx

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